Voltaire

Living in Virginia is a constant reminder that my identities are regularly demonized.
Many people think of religion as an end in itself and assume that being religious is the only thing God requires of them. The Bible doesn't bear that out. God wants people to be real, to be good, and to become all he made them to be, which requires people to come to him in faith.
What measure of responsibility can then be ascribed to Gede, or to any other supernatural force, for Haiti's unparalleled catastophes?
For some mysterious reason, three dramatically different books ended up on my nightstand -- three books written by three
Here is this guy who berates people like Megyn Kelly (although there have been rumors of a rapprochement, "Donald Trump and
PARIS -- In the wake of violent events in the West, any hasty judgement on Muslims does more harm than good. It serves the terrorists on a silver platter.
A few days ago, Judith Aller, a prominent concert violinist and conductor in Europe and America, wrote me a note saying that her now dead husband's film about screenwriter Dalton Trumbo was going to be premiered--and asked me if I wanted to go.
Have you ever been around the kind of person who has something disgustingly positive to say about everything? There are people who lose the ability to feel pain.
Humor in the church is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, what pastor doesn't like to start their sermon off with an attention-grabbing joke to wake people up in the pews?
Every time I visit Paris, I think about the way Hemingway referred to the City of Light as a "Moveable Feast." But I have to admit that I like the Russian translation of the title even more, "A Holiday That is Always with You."
Trust. It's a hefty word, stamped on American currency ("In God We Trust"), integrated into marriage vows, and considered a vital component for both professional and personal relationships. Yet too often trust is on autopilot, given freely unless proven otherwise.
The proper response to the Charlie Hebdo murders is not to jail "blasphemers" of any persuasion, whether they hold a pen or a microphone.
It should not escape notice that a handful of the world leaders who were at the march advocating freedom of speech do not uphold this right in their own countries, much less promote it. It made me think of an Oscar-worthy performance, ending when the credits rolled and everyone went home.
While I support the right of the journalists involved to express their evident contempt for the religion of Islam, I also support my right to express my disdain for the acts that precipitated their murders.
The worst fanaticism is religious fanaticism. It is based on absolute certainty. When someone is sure that he has God on his side, his hand doesn't waver. That's what we've just witnessed in Paris.
Paris has a way of drawing one's gaze to the past. As we marched southeast yesterday from Place de la République, crowds singing and banners flying, we asserted proud and ancient sentiments against a tragedy that had blown us all back.
In his new book, Voltaire contre-attaque (Laffont), a marvel of rebellious youth and jubilant wisdom, we find a philosophical rehabilitation of the author of Candide.
I traveled to Europe a few weeks ago and, for the first time, I didn't attend a conference on youth education, or meet with leading business people on how we can innovate startups worldwide. Instead I explored the opportunities provided by a few select bookstores.
"In 1914 the Great War began... and has lasted ever since." This quote can be found at the DOX Center for Contemporary Art in Prague the capital of the 'heart of Europe.'