vouchers

School voucher programs, which Betsy DeVos hopes to expand, have helped fund Scientology-linked schools.
A Tough Job I'm hopeful that Botel can help the president understand the real challenges facing public education and the
On May 19, 2016, Louisiana citizen James Finney submitted a public records request for data concerning student voucher applications
To fight poverty, we must simply abolish it. And to abolish it, we must get over the many scientifically unfounded mental barriers that have always prevented us from doing it to this day, mainly the notion that one must work for one's daily bread.
  This originally appeared on Education Post. The union's analysis concluded that charter schools cost the district more
For many, becoming homeless is a symptom of cumulative instability in their lives. They may lack basic education, job skills
Is that comparison in bad taste? Too melodramatic? The high mortality and incarceration rates of poorly educated, impoverished, Black Louisianians indicates otherwise.
We assume that low achievement indicates a poor school when, in fact, it is merely proof of a neglected community. We persistently fail to address the economic and social injustices that created the community and then we blame schools and teachers for the mayhem we have enabled.
Most domestic lounges are so terrible that it's hard for me to feign any enthusiasm for them these days. Even the freebies, from the Milanos to the lamps, aren't worth it in my opinion. And who the hell needs a lamp for their flight?
Under Edwards, it seems that school choice in Louisiana is finally going to experience some long-overdue attention from a governor not overtly biased toward charters and vouchers. This is good.
The pot of $600 billion dollars of taxpayer money, allocated every year to educate American children in public schools, has proven to be irresistible to corporate and political interests.
The Republican party's educational platform prioritizes school choice and the programs that facilitate it, while the Democratic party has rejected the idea of vouchers and similar systems. Party identification, however, does not seem to drive attitudes about this issue among the public.
I've resisted this notion for a long time. The money, I liked to say, belongs to the taxpayers, who have used it to create a school system that serves the entire community by filling that community with well-educated adults. But hey-- maybe I've been wrong.
Even though the states with the high teacher union rates get better results than the states with the low rates, conservatives still pretend that unions are somehow ruining public education.
I'm not buying what you're selling and, frankly, I'm wondering how you can engage in such a scheme without some sense of shame. I'm publishing this response because I hope other school administrators, teachers and families won't fall for this devious marketing ploy.
Conservatives often claim they are big fans of school choice. I think they're wrong. I don't mean that I want to disagree with them using fluffy progressive liberal arguments. I mean that in the world of conservative values and goals, school choice really doesn't fit. Let me explain.
Nearly three years later, just yesterday, the Wisconsin State Senate finally caught wind of the investigation through the media, and decided to inquire further.
In a voucher system, disabled students are not always given true choice, as no choice exists if private schools refuse disabled students' needed services.
Does a controversial bill with a billion-dollar price tag hang on a wait list that might not even exist? I sincerely hope not.