vulture capitalism

Corporate greed is at the center of the dispute. XPO port and rail drivers are fighting company wage theft in excess of $200 million because of persistent misclassification as independent contractors, a scheme the National Labor Relations Board ruled is designed to deny workers of their legal right to form a union.
The money poured in by the millions, then by the hundreds of millions, and finally by the billions. Over weak coffee in a
The New York Times broke the news that Marco Rubio just won the jackpot: the endorsement of billionaire hedge fund investor Paul Singer. But the story offered little explanation of what could prove to be a decisive turning point in the Republican primary race.
While Singer and Hermann pursue Argentina in court, Washington lobbyists like Raben are making sure the issue remains in
At this moment, the U.S. economy is probably most properly described as a classic example of "crony capitalism." And if we are going anywhere new as an economy, we are in danger of heading to something even worse -- "vulture capitalism."
For all the talk about "introducing" Romney to America, Romney has to remain an enigma. He can't talk honestly about the economic calamity that Obama inherited because he champions the very policies that led to it. He must make us forget it.
Maya Angelou warned us: "Believe people when they tell you who they are. They know themselves better than you do." Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan have told us exactly who they are. The American people would do well to listen.
Mitt Romney is the perfect Republican candidate: a straight, religious, white man who is rich and can self-fund his campaign. And Romney shares a common Republican personality defect: he doesn't empathize with average Americans.
How to build an economy and political system that secures this general welfare, now and in the future, is the most critical and challenging question we face.