Wael Ghonim

"While once social media was seen as a liberating means to speak truth to power, now the issue is how to speak truth to social media."
"Donald Trump is a living example of the damage the mobocratic algorithms of social media can do to the democratic process."
Parlio, the activist's new platform, aims to elevate online discussions of politically and socially charged topics.
We don't have to be perfect saints or know every answer to every question to begin working for a more just world. We can be wounded or hesitant ourselves, sometimes profoundly so.
Is the biggest hurdle on climate change outright denial? Or is it the sense that of being overwhelmed and too late, that there's nothing we can do?
Ralph Waldo Emerson once asked what we would do if the stars only came out once every thousand years. No one would sleep
Allow me please to take you back for a moment to the beginning of 2011. Remember how surprised the world was that, in just 18 days, a leaderless grass-root uprising managed to topple the Mubarak regime that had ruled Egypt with an iron fist for 30 years?
The anti-gay, xenophobic, and misogynist bullies of the Christian right are so determined to defeat President Obama and promote orthodoxy that they endanger American diplomats and undermine fundamental principles of freedom.
What did Ghonim do to foster online engagement that eventually contributed to real, on the streets, offline action? It's simple really. He spoke, users listened and responded, and then he acknowledged their contributions.
Anyone rooting for Egyptians and the progress of their revolution was up against a nerve-racking week of news and analysis surrounding the one-year anniversary of the first coordinated protests at Tahrir Square.