Waiting

“Waiting for Superman” (2010) was a propaganda movie promoting charter schools. I call this blog “Waiting for Evidence,” because
Life is short. Youth is finite. You have every opportunity to make the most of the life you have right now. Your choices
Waiting for a baby may be the worst wait of all. After delivery, there's peace. Peace is an assurance that in the midst of
Rana Florida is author of the business best-seller, Upgrade, Taking Your Work and Life from Ordinary to Extraordinary Long
When Grub ran into Danny Meyer at this year's MoMA Party in the Garden, we asked him, of course, about the state of his no-tipping policy and the difficulties faced by his fellow restaurateurs making the change.
It's having your desires and dreams since a little girl put on hold. It's lots of tears. It's lots of pain. It's lots of heartache. This is infertility.
It's because of our own expectations that we need Advent - not a time to wait for the gift we think we want, but a time to prepare to receive the gift we need, the gift of love and hope that comes with the baby savior, even if all he can do is just look back with a gassy smile.
What a beautiful film, what wondrous performances, what a perfect way to describe tragedy and its aftermath for the survivors, without dwelling in pathos or finding a simple way out of its inevitable ending. You know, just so everything can be tidy and easy, as a less talented filmmaker would have done.
Midlife seems to put us in situations that demand multitasking. Whether you're fixing dinner and need to make a late phone call or have to juggle the competing demands of a job that forces you to monitor emails and clients, you're pretty much forced to divide your mental bandwidth into portions.
Now, don't get me wrong, having things to look forward to and be excited about is great, but at the same time we are missing being fully present in this moment, right now. At the same time we also put off doing the things that we love because we figure that we have plenty of time.
We only have one life to live. And though waiting may take up a great deal of it, we hope and pray the waiting will reap its benefits. We'll just have to throw the dice and pray for the best. We'll never know otherwise.
I have been challenged in countless ways during this season of healing, and yet the greatest obstacle of all has been waiting.
The pain of not having a significant other over the holidays can feel like a deep purple bruise. The pain of a breakup can feel like a gaping wound you're trying to close with a Band-Aid.
Advent is about waiting, a concept that's becoming increasingly unpopular in our world of instant gratification and constant connectedness. We want what we want and we want it now. Advent reminds us that waiting can be a good thing, a time to prepare ourselves.
My prayer -- for myself and others -- is that we might all have some quiet to reflect upon the true purpose of the Advent Season. I am reminded of what it must have been like for the ancient followers of God, awaiting the coming of the Messiah.
For the duration of their little lives, my children have watched videos on Netflix and Amazon. They have never had to sit through TV commercials.
We wait for a holiday, a vacation, a break, a change. We sigh, we tap our foot, we moan about long lines, days of the week, seconds on the clock. We wait and we wait, and we don't realize that in the grand scheme of things, all of this slow waiting is hiding the fact that time is flying.
I left the message in the "Drafts" folder and within a day or two, found I felt absolutely no need to reply to the email. All that steam had evaporated; I didn't care.