Waiting for Superman

“Waiting for Superman” (2010) was a propaganda movie promoting charter schools. I call this blog “Waiting for Evidence,” because
Recommendations from the Best K-12 Teachers in the Country Their original list contained over 55 books. Last week, I sent
You'd think that that public television would support public education, but you'd be wrong. The Public Broadcasting System (PBS) has gotten in bed with the billionaires and conservatives who want to privatize our public schools.
The reform public relations spin machine has struggled recently as more families reject top-down micromanaging of their children's schools. Common Core standards were originally sold as a corrective to the rote instruction encouraged by NCLB. Now Common Core is promising "tests worth teaching to."
The Waiting for Superman director discusses what it takes to be an effective teacher today and his hopes for his children. "It would be the happiest day of my life," says Guggenheim, "if my son or daughter came to me and said, 'Dad, I want to be a teacher.'"
Here's my brutally harsh interrogation of my better writing half whose work includes the Oscar-winning An Inconvenient Truth, Waiting For Superman and It Might Get Loud.
Aside from the results themselves, what is most distressing is that the United States has been preoccupied with the decline in its education standards and performance for well over a half century.
There was no DC miracle. Browbeating students and teachers into raising scores on state tests only makes them better at taking state tests, and reforming our schools in hopes of replicating an illusion is a petty crime against humanity.
You might not know how to play chess. Or you might think chess is boring. But that shouldn't stop you from seeing a documentary about some special middle school kids who are pretty good competitive chess players and anything but boring.
The end of the Chicago teachers' strike was but a temporary regional truce in the civil war that plagues the nation's public schools. There is no end in sight, in part because -- as often happens in wartime -- the conflict is increasingly being driven by profiteers.
It's one thing when documentaries like Davis Guggenheim's Waiting for 'Superman and Madeleine Sackler's much better The Lottery look at problems in public education and offer some solutions (such as charter schools).
With the 2013 mayoral election in New York likely to produce a Democratic mayor supported by the teachers' union, education reform seems likely to join other major political disagreements in current U.S. politics, where the extremists dominate the debate and moderates have no forum.
*CONVINCING A SKEPTICAL PUBLIC: Wearing polka-dotted reading glasses and with a thick stack of notecards, NSVF president
None of us would want to have our job performance judged on an outcome that we don't really control. But that's where teachers now find themselves.
Tepper, who heads Appaloosa Management, has a long history of political donations. According to FEC records, Tepper has given
Sad that Nicholas Kristof is joining a pool of writers who are creating a new American stereotype: the bad teacher.
Schools do not operate in a vacuum. Poverty has devastating effects on a child's social and emotional development. For our poorest students, just getting to school can be a challenge.
My thoughts on Superfoods, Superman, and Super Committees are pretty much the same. It's nice to pretend that there are simple solutions to complicated problems but I live in the real world.
For a lot of us, the crisis in our nation's schools feels overwhelming and the problems too big for any one person to make a difference. But the other night it didn't feel that way. Here's why.