Wangari Maathai

It is of course the politically correct thing to acknowledge climate change as a reality but none of these world leaders are actually doing the ecologically correct thing and doing something about it.
Wanjira: I think overall it was great. First of all we all wanted an agreement out of Paris, so there were high expectations
This year, as we celebrate the 12th anniversary of Dr. Maathai's receipt of the 2004 Nobel Prize, we are each challenged to plant hope. This is a call to leadership.
Today, I weep not only for Kenya, but all of humanity. A senseless attack has left 147 -- maybe more -- people dead, and the innocence of countless others shattered. I interact with college age students every day, and sometimes wonder if a school shooting could happen on our campus.
All this conceptual language may translate to describe a new strategy for our relationship with the ocean: a place that reflects the outcome of our use, that respects and sustains the value of Nature, and that integrates and reconciles human needs and natural resources for the future of all mankind.
On top of the shear panic unleashed by the spread of the Ebola virus from West Africa, an astonishing amount of ignorance has reared its ugly head. As some have commented, this ignorance may be more dangerous to millions of people than the actual virus.
Climate change will not be mitigated, let alone stopped or reversed, unless all the countries of the world become serious about systemic, total, and orchestrated reorientations of their economies and societies' ways of living on the Earth.
If she were alive, we have no doubt Wangari would be deeply engaged in the global climate debate, and promoting the realization of climate justice. She'd be working to protect the forests of the Congo Basin and she'd be keeping her eye on that farmer in Yaoundé and those like her.
She remembered a land of plenty -- water at hand and fields that yielded food for the family. When she returned home, however, Wangari Maathai stood on an arid wasteland, where worn-out women walked miles for food and water, struggling to provide sustenance for their children.
I'm not sure of all that Gorbachev said because I grew pensive watching him. There have been several iconic change agents
As public space has become increasingly privatized and commercialized, such green space reminds people that they're citizens and rights-bearers, and not merely consumers and logo-wearers.
The culture war in Uganda over LGBT rights is a double-binded problem: a struggle over the hegemony of fundamentalism and a fog behind which a power grab for the nation's oil reserves and natural wealth can take place.
You can argue -- however hollowly -- that a political party has been suppressed because it was plotting with foreigners. It is difficult to make that argument against a sycamore tree.
More than ever, as we face the challenges of combating climate change, deforestation, the melting of the Arctic sea ice, we will need these women: their skills, their wisdom and their knowledge.
The unexpected impact of Dr. Wangari Maathai's work was to show that the solutions to our many societal and planetary ills often rests with those who bear the greatest burden.
Though I am about as far as possible from being a rural Kenyan woman, Wangari changed my life as well by the beauty and brilliance of her words and deeds, and by taking my hand saying, "Come to Kenya. You will love it."
I hope that the world our daughters help construct will continue to "plant the seeds of peace" -- from San Francisco to Nairobi and back.
My hope is that the stories of these visionary women present to us the flame of the passionate life, the knife of insight, and the courage to stand for what one sees without looking away.
2011 was a monumental year in a lot of ways. Sadly, we lost many amazing minds and talents along the way. Here's a round
As an African woman, I declare: The Nobel Prize got it right, it celebrated three African Women. African Women are doing the work in the trenches. We often forget the doers and usually acknowledges the talkers.