war on crime

What remains endlessly hinted at about the 2016 presidential race, but not fully articulated, is that something enormous -- bigger than politics, bigger than America itself, perhaps -- is trembling and kicking just below the surface, struggling to emerge.
The former president responded to criticism of welfare reform and a controversial crime bill passed in the ’90s.
Want a ringside seat for the war on crime? Go to killedbypolice.net. A few hours ago (as I write this), the site had listed 1,191 police killings in the U.S. this year. I just looked again. The total is up one.
FBI Director, James B. Comey has a theory that is correct, but only in part because his clarity is obscured by his self-serving perspective.
Despite the enormous investment by governments at every level in court and penal systems, they don't work. That is to say, they make matters worse.
The cellphone video "reality footage" just doesn't stop. Black men are shot, killed, handcuffed. The shortcomings of their prematurely terminated lives soon become public knowledge, vaguely justifying the shocking wrongness of the officer's action -- always poisoning the grief.
Overreaching governmental intrusions into our personal privacy, criminalization of minor drug offenses and an extremely overpopulated prison are realities we've all begrudgingly come to accept. But why?
According to reports, members of the 60-member immigrant group had been living on the streets in Paris's La Courneuve district
Inheritance is White, poor credit scores, Black. A missing woman is White and a fugitive on the loose is Black.