W.E.B. Du Bois

"Love is at the root of our resistance," the former NFL player reportedly said in his acceptance speech.
The danger is that “white privilege” still comes across as an accusation, whether it is meant that way or not.
At the end of a globetrotting career that took U.S. civil rights pioneer and author W.E.B. Du Bois from his home in America
Welcome to 2017, where everything's made up and the spelling doesn't matter.
"How does it feel to be a problem?" William Edward Burghardt Du Bois asked this probing question more than a century ago
Fears of being crushed by debt or of falling off the economic ladder are pressuring students to conform, and we must find ways to counteract these pressures or we risk undermining our scientific productivity as well as our broad cultural creativity.
In his 1903 book, The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois discusses continually being asked in indirect ways, "How does it feel to be a problem?" Three African American seniors at the University of Alabama came together to answer that question.
Du Bois is recognized as one of the monumental intellectual and political figures of the 20th century and certainly its most influential African American thinker. Author of eighteen books, Du Bois' writings challenged America's ideas about race and helped lead the early crusade for civil rights.
Long before Mahatma Gandhi's activism inspired the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and civil rights leaders, another trans-Atlantic relationship would play a significant role in shaping African-American thought: the close friendship between W.E.B. Du Bois and Indian freedom fighter Lala Lajpat Rai, known by many as the Lion of Punjab.
The first major box office hit charged a staggering $2 admission and reached 50 million people before sound films appeared in 1927. Its millions in profits built Hollywood. Beyond profits, it aimed to educate the public in the values of white supremacy.
In many cases crowdfunding has allowed creative artists the chance to bypass the Hollywood greenlighting system to produce works that might otherwise be shelved.
Sure, we must pay attention to what our graduates will do with their education, and we must give them the skills to translate what they learn in classrooms to their lives after graduation. But we shouldn't reduce our understanding of "their lives after graduation" to their very first job.
There are the large moments. The ones where the Veil is lifted. These are the moments when the music stops and the dance ends. These are the moments when one can keep humming the tune and twirling like nothing has changed or stop to realize that those beyond the Veil have no cause for dancing.
These are not new questions for American communities. African Americans have been calling for justice in this land of injustice for more than 400 years.
Du Bois was one of the towering intellectual figures of the 20th century. Fifty years after his death, his ideas -- and his activism for economic and social justice -- remain an important influence on American culture.
egardless of your opinion about George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin, we mustn't ignore the underlying conversation -- a heated, potent, and critical discussion about race and racism.