Wednesday Martin

"They're like oil and vinegar." We're all familiar with this expression and it couldn't be more accurate when it comes to the relationship between a stepmother and her teen stepdaughter. The conflict can take a toll, creating tension in father-daughter relationships.The fathers don't make it any easier.
"People understand what a memoir is," she told HuffPost Live. "People understand what accessible, social science is." Whether people actually understand this, however, is still up for debate.
Books we read are a telling of who we are. This summer, several noted authors have released new books sure to redefine and influence our thoughts, world views and opinions.
The reality is that all of us -- working for pay or not -- have to handle our daily lives, whatever they may hold for us to relish or endure. What is highly unproductive is for us to stand back and judge. There is no single metric that means we're doing well.
Big sacrifices like the ones I made -- giving up a career and a fat paycheck of my own -- deserve a little extra recognition. Calling it a bonus and making it clear that it is mine further underscores my right to spend it as I see fit.
It has long been my contention that there are many adults walking around but very few grown-ups. What is a "Grown-Up"? A "Grown-Up" is one who is comfortable in their own skin.
Stepfamilies often experience extraordinary stress as the holidays--with their pressure cooker of "family" expectations--get underway. So, let go of the Three Big Myths of Stepfamily life.
Many women suffer from what I call Stepmartyr Syndrome--embracing the notion that they are going to make it all better for everyone, whatever the cost to them personally.
I didn't become a writer so that I could be a market researcher who tailors my thinking and writing to the interests of the people who made fun of me in high school.
We're hearing a lot about the new U.S. Census these days and many might wonder what, precisely, is at stake. For stepfamilies, the answer is: quite a bit.