Wendy Whelan

Wendy Whelan only ever wanted to dance. But what happens when you can't dance anymore?
For all the news on New York City arts and culture, visit ZEALnyc Front Page. In June, Joyce Unleased returns. Inaugurated
The New York City Ballet has returned with all its relevance, strong and modern. The dancers are not "stingy." They are not "holding back." They exist in the "now," "right now." Balanchine would be proud.
There's no shortage of supplies, services or opportunities for every one of the city's delightful dancers and extraordinary dance companies.
It was a lazy Saturday afternoon in Chelsea. Wanderers traipsed across the High Line, stealing light from the sun and embracing summer with selfies and gelato. Underneath them and a few streets east, crowds ventured into the Joyce, the heat outside prompting a soft malaise among them.
Don't get me wrong, there's no problem with being a sex worker, or a wife, or a ballerina, or a heiress if you so choose. But what the female protagonists and antagonists in Gigi and An American in Paris lack is agency in their happily ever afters.
This is an extraordinary time in the dance world, when five of the greatest ballerinas of our time, from leading American ballet companies, have, coincidentally, all announced their retirement within months of each other.
Philanthropists and visionary entrepreneurs must sustain companies which will allow brilliant choreographers like Beamish to create their body of work without distraction. This type of support is a necessary step to creating The Coming Golden Age of Fine Art.
Tears, flowers and an outpouring of love accompanied Wendy Whelan's farewell performance at the New York City Ballet on Saturday, October 18. Many of us would call the NYCB the greatest ballet company in the world, and, so, we collectively mourn the loss of its reining queen.
Wendy Whelan, the much beloved principal dancer for New York City Ballet, is already a legend. Her career has spanned an astonishing 29 years during which she has done pretty much everything imaginable.
8. Chehon Wespi-Tschopp After 30 years at the New York City Ballet, the principal dancer will bid her adieu this October
Brian Brooks Moving Company performed Run Don't Run at BAM Fisher in Brooklyn. It's a great new theater and the dance's set design was an exciting feature to photograph.
Ella Baff introduced her before every performance as a National Treasure, and that's the perfect description. There's a reason she's a superstar. She is just captivating.
After years of photographing and filming performances and rehearsals, Nel and I believe in the power of great dance documentation, but nothing compares to seeing Wendy Whelan perform live. She is captivating, enthralling, alluring -- I just can't describe how I feel when I watch her dance.
George Balanchine once said, "See the music, hear the dance." Perhaps Balanchine's successor, Peter Martins, can add, "See the music, hear the dance, Instagram the dogs."
The women we look up to in the arts -- from New York City Ballet's Wendy Whelan soaring above the stage at Lincoln Center to action hero Elizabeth Streb scaling a building in London -- have their own inspiring heroines, some famous and others less known.
VIDF has grown into one of the most renowned summer festivals in the world and has been widely acclaimed for its innovation.
Corella Ballet danced DGV in New York a few years ago. But that performance lacked the blunt impact the ballet has at NYCB
2010-05-03-outsidepull.jpg It's no wonder Alexei Ratmansky is in such great demand. He is the real deal, making his own dance architecture out of thin air.