Werner Herzog

The new trailer for "The Mandalorian" mixes high-tech imagery with the lone gunman bravado of an American Western.
How the director convinced North Korea to embrace him, and more.
Werner Herzog, legendary auteur, prolific documentarian, whose many films include Aguirre Wrath of God, Fitzcarraldo, Rescue Dawn, Grizzly Man, Cave of Forgotten Dreams, Encounters at the End of the World, is also a cult internet celebrity.
That's just one idea presented in Werner Herzog's new doc about the internet.
There is one area though that most film schools have seemed to overlook, and that is beyond the mechanics, beyond the completion of the movie. What is the effect of cinema on its audience?
"Christine" and Werner Herzog's new doc offer mixed results.
Todd Solondz's latest does not live up to the charm of its title pooch.
I interviewed iconic German filmmaker Werner Herzog in 2009 for his film Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans. Several memories: Herzog's dry, yet oddly melodious speaking voice; his somewhat acerbic sense of humor; his unique, grimly optimistic outlook on life.
The Mt. Rushmorification of social discourse is destroying any semblance of nuanced, sophisticated analysis. And I'm right there with it, doing what I can to continue the trend.
I interviewed character actor Steve Zahn, one of film's most visible faces over the past 20 years, in 2009. He was memorably funny, energetic and self-effacing, much like the characters he tends to play.