West End

The view through the Palladian window overlooks a garden that was master-planned in 1990 by landscape architect Larry Maxey
"I'm just going to do things that I like to do, sing songs that I like to sing," Carmen Cusack said, sounding carefree, in a recent interview about her solo concert debut at NYC's Feinstein's/54 Below.
So what is it like being the only guy? "It can be a scary thing," Ryder admits. "But it also had an incredible impact on
Going away for Christmas with little kids, who wonder how Santa will find them, can be tricky. As a parent, I fret about the logistics of trivial things like: Where will the stockings hang?
It was as if the bicycle was riding itself as she extended her arms and legs into impossibly beautiful positions. She pointed
Now that Shakespeare in Love has officially opened in the West End and been hailed by the critics as " ... a grand adaptation" and " ... a swooning delight," Lee Hall is ready to talk about how tough it actually was to translate the Academy-Award winning screenplay to the stage.
How can any of us find the words to wish a happy 450th birthday to the single most significant, elegant, funny, wise and human writer ever to use the English language? That's what I, and countless others, have thought and think of Shakespeare.
When the Criterion first opened its doors, Alexander Graham Bell had yet to claim the patent for the telephone, Thomas Edison was still five years away from inventing a practical light bulb and the first Ford Model T wouldn't see a road for more than three decades.
Theatregoers aren't asking, "Is it too American/British for the West End/Broadway?" Instead, they're saying, "I don't care where it's from, is it any damn good?" In the cases of both The Book of Mormon and Matilda, the answer is one word, regardless of accent: "Yes."
Several months back, the artistic director of a large U.S. theatre and I were discussing a British playwright we both hold