west texas explosion

The backlash to this incident became a turning point in the history of the US and global labor movements. But 104 years later, it has become clear that too many folks in this country have forgotten the painful lessons of that day.
Late last week, hundreds of organizations and people sent a letter to President Obama warning that his administration is running of time to act on an issue long-identified by the president as essential to our national security and public safety: protecting our people from the dangers of accidents or deliberate attacks at U.S. chemical plants. Here is the text of the letter.
It's been a year since Obama signed an executive order directing federal agencies to modernize chemical plant safety and security policies. Since then federal agencies tasked with developing new requirements for all chemical facilities in the United States have moved painfully slow.
Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott (R) came under a barrage of criticism this week after he urged the state's residents to
We owe it to the victims of West, Texas, and all the people living and working near these chemical facilities, to take strong action.
The Chemical Safety Board investigates explosions and fires at U.S. chemical plants. It has no regulatory or law enforcement
The research was released ahead of the April 17 anniversary of an explosion at a West, Texas, fertilizer plant, which killed
"I know some people don't want it because they knew someone who got blown away or hurt, but we need one somewhere in the
I've heard Obama administration officials describe chemical plant safety as a national security issue. I find that encouraging. It is a national security issue that poses a real threat to our people, just as, say, Iran's nuclear program does.
Obama asked agencies to come up with a list of potential changes following the blast in April, which killed 15 and injured