what women want

Mel Gibson made $25 million for "What Women Want." The entire budget for "What Men Want" was $22 million.
Jimmy Carter leaving the Southern Baptist church over women's equality One thing is for sure, the focus on women is everywhere
I noticed immediately when I met him that Robert Dubac has a warmth about him that you don't expect from a comedian; maybe it's a result of his choice to live in Telluride, Colorado or perhaps its due to the fact that he is really a deep thinker with philosophical thoughts evident in his comedy.
The premise here is we women know precisely what traits we like in men, even if men are the last ones to figure this out. Hint: there are actually ten things we love, not just seven.
The perfect gift for your female partner over 50 cannot be found in jewelry or clothing stores. You have likely bought her enough sweaters and jewels to last 50 lifetimes -- and much of the stuff has never come out of safes and drawers. What aging women want most money cannot buy. What we want most is to be left the hell alone -- and to be loved.
“Jeopardy!” made up fake rap names and they were… ridiculous.
This week, the normally controversy-free game show "Jeopardy!" managed to insult female viewers with rather confounding answers to its "What Women Want" category.
According to a new study, when it comes to choosing a sexual partner, men of all ages fantasize about one type of woman: the
One of TV’s most loved game shows is being heavily criticized over a recent category: What Women Want.
There seems to be a tendency for women to hold beliefs and attitudes about their own gender that are similar to the beliefs and attitudes that men have about women. In other words, women seem to be stereotyping other women like men.
Who are these strange creatures with their wide hips and functional nipples? What are they thinking as they sit across from you at the dinner table, their lips moving, making sounds. Do they have likes? Dislikes? Neutral feelings? What, for God's sake, do they want?
Whether you're married or single, straight or gay, by nature men are competitive. With this in mind, it's always a good idea to know what women want because after all, they make great allies, and we can truly benefit from another point of view. In my survey of more than 20 women in their 40s, 50s, and 60s, I was surprised to find that the focus was greater on manners, grooming and tailoring, than fashion and trends.
If there's one thing I've learned about heterosexual women, it's that they like men. But they love cupcakes. So, armed with those two pieces of knowledge, I set out to create a Tinder persona that no woman could resist: a man's face drawn on a cupcake.
We have grown so accustomed to meeting others' standards that we may not know what we want in a relationship. But in learning to love ourselves, we look for partners who will love us in return, and write off those who will bring negativity and judgment into our lives.
In an age when the options for college-educated women seem boundless, a new debate about what women want — and whether or
He's protective. Sixty-nine percent of readers rated protective as a character trait of their ideal billionaire hero -- making
Writer and comedian Emma Tattenbaum-Fine demonstrates that feminism and sex are NOT mutually exclusive.