where to invade next

Politics
The disease is a belief in violence as an answer. THE answer. Now is the time to address the disease. It is time to listen
Impact
Fine cuisine is alive and well in the school lunchrooms of France. The menu includes lamb tajine, veal, crêpes, organic veggies, pâté and organic bread. Oh, yes -- and a cheese course.
Wellness
In his latest documentary, Where To Invade Next, Michael Moore "invades" country after country, looking for lifestyles worth appropriating - so that he can plant the American flag upon them and bring them home. Of particular interest to me were his school visits.
Entertainment
In that same vein, I was taken aback, in a good way when I watched Maurice Dekkers' Ants on a Shrimp, a culinary film about
Politics
Norway's prison system is based on the concept of restorative justice, which repairs the harm caused by crime instead of punishing individuals. Prisoners are treated like human beings and live in a humane environment.
Politics
For at least the last four decades now I feel like I've been living in Beached America: a nation that has lost its values, even as it writhes in violent agitation, inflicting its military on the vulnerable regions of the planet.
Media
Where to Invade Next is Michael Moore's most disturbing film yet. Contrasting the progressive public policies practiced abroad with those here at home, Moore starkly drives home just how inhumane American society has truly become.
Entertainment
While Moore's previous films utilized satire and gallows humor to show how bad things in America really are, Where to Invade Next smartly assumes you already know America's pain points and doesn't dwell on them long.
Impact
On Mother's Day, May 8, 2016, Justice 4 the Wrongfully Incarcerated will be walking to Albany, New York for legislative change on behalf of the wrongfully incarcerated and their families.
Impact
Over the last five and a half years I have been heavily involved in the activist community, organizing around environmental
Impact
This post is part of a series produced by The Huffington Post and The Hammer & Chisel Awards, in conjunction with the upcoming
Impact
We knew things were bad when water coming out of the kitchen taps in our homes in Flint, Michigan, looked like frying oil and smelled like an open sewer. We're not water experts; we're moms.
Impact
At 45 years old I'm still running and sweating just to survive. Recently I was forced to move into a two bedroom house that I have to share with my two sons and my daughter, simply because I can't afford anything larger. I am gearing up to start a second job, but even that won't be enough.
Impact
Gloucester placed its 100th participant into treatment in August. Today, we have placed more than 350 people in treatment
Impact
On September 19th, the day after the U.S. House of Representatives voted to defund Planned Parenthood, I told my Facebook feed that I'd had an abortion. My disclosure offered no justification for why I'd decided to end the pregnancy, nor was it padded with wistfulness, shame, or regret.
Impact
Then, suddenly, here was one of the biggest social crusaders in the country honoring me with his Hammer and Chisel Award
Impact
This post is part of a series produced by The Huffington Post and The Hammer & Chisel Awards, in conjunction with the upcoming
Impact
Moore explains the origins of the Awards: "This idea came to me while filming at the Berlin Wall during the making of 'Where
Entertainment
Even in short a conversation with documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, things quickly turn to politics. Long before anyone was really acknowledging Bernie Sanders, from a bustling red carpet of the Chicago International film Festival, Michael Moore was predicting Sanders as a force to contend with.
Impact
When I moved to America, I thought I would be able to achieve the American Dream. I went to college to get my business degree, so that I could get ahead. $89,000 in debt later, I ended up being even further worse off.