white house conference on aging

The Abduction of Lillie A 2013 AARP report gave a "best guess" estimate of the number of adults under guardianship nationally
Are you safe at home? It's a simple question that social workers, nurses, physicians, emergency medical technicians, and indeed all health care providers need to ask their older patients every time they see them. Why? Because that simple question can be a crucial first step toward identifying potential elder mistreatment.
We are in the midst of an age wave, brought on by baby boomers who are changing the nation's demographics and redefining the meaning of old age.
Experts know that older adults rely on good health to remain independent and productive but by the measure of medical diagnoses, baby boomers are sicker than their predecessors.
His most brilliant move of the morning was to own what is often a core contradiction of religion: although religion often relies on tradition and a consistency of dogma and practice to achieve its ends, the Pope reminded us, "we know that things can change."
As Americans are living longer it is becoming more common for the luckiest of families to have five generations together at special occasions. But while multi-generational families are growing in the U.S., I've noticed that generations don't mix as much here as in some other cultures.
The White House held its sixth Conference on Aging, and what a difference a decade makes. In 2005, cellphones were not smart. Mailing DVD movies to your home was considered cutting edge.
Fresh ideas and approaches can empower a brighter future of aging, and the emergence of financial gerontology is cause for hope. This link between two disciplines that are critically important to the aging population presents the potential for new solutions and healthy, productive and purposeful outcomes for today's older adults and for generations to come.
Discussing everything from retirement security and healthy aging to long-term services and elder justice, the conference also gave due consideration to caregiving issues and the importance of establishing support systems for the nation's 50 million professional caregivers.
On any given day, working in the field of aging can be fulfilling, meaningful, or, occasionally, frustrating. This enormous issue does not always get the attention it deserves. So, as much as anything, the recent White House Conference on Aging provided a welcome occasion for recognition and celebration.
Isn't it about time we reimagined what being old is? We can start with who we call 'elderly,' and maybe we could stop assuming that every 66-year-old is going to retire the very moment they reached full retirement age.
It's time to tear down these age-segregated walls and rebuild the bridges -- the social compact -- that made our country economically viable and strong.
With zero funds to bring delegates to Washington, Monday's White House Conference on Aging will rely on a mixture of tools to spread its message: tweets, questions delivered through Facebook, and "watch" parties in all 50 states.
The White House Conference On Aging aims to simplify finding services for older Americans.
We must tackle inequality at its roots. We should move from reflection to action, heeding the recommendations that come from experts in socio-economic inequality. A system reformed for the most vulnerable -- as a history of policy change in this country will confirm -- becomes a system that's ultimately stronger for everyone
We must acknowledge and celebrate the changing face and composition of those aging in America today by focusing on cultural competency and combating all remaining vestiges of discrimination based on age, race, gender or sexual orientation. We should strive to make sure that the quality of life keeps pace with the quantity of life for all our people.
if the White House is serious about several of its clearly critical themes -- take elder abuse, for example -- it will use the unique symbol of a once a decade event on aging to debunk the myths and stigma of aging and in the course give stronger and more powerful voice precisely to topics like elder abuse.
A lot of appropriate attention is focused on hunger and food insecurity as well as obesity. However, malnutrition, also known as undernutrition, is a bigger threat because of the deeper health consequences it creates.
Simply asserting increased longevity -- that miracle of 20th century science, medicine, technology and health care -- will be a drag on the economy lacks both vision and imagination.
The Alliance for Retired Americans is here to make sure that our elected officials hear the stories of seniors like Bob Meeks. Our message: Hands off our earned Social Security and Medicare benefits. Seniors shouldn't face bankruptcy in order to pay their medical bills.