Whole grain

Although humans have been eating grains for centuries, the modern grains we consume today are not the same as those eaten
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Don’t let clever marketing fool you – it’s what’s on the nutrition label and ingredient list that counts.
This notion was given support by several studies. In a 2007 randomized controlled study, 23 Australian 15-25 year olds showed
A new study, led by Nirupa Matthan from Tufts Medical Center, and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
While it's true that the caveman did not consume a lot of whole grains, the fact they have been with us for millennia and are considered an important part of some of the healthiest diets in the world lends credence to the idea that they are not only harmless but essential for achieving optimal health.
For such a universal activity, eating can be pretty confusing. Grocery stores are crowded with nutritional jargon -- think
A donut made with whole-wheat flour is just slightly healthier that the refined wheat one, but that doesn't make it into a healthy food, and the whole wheat-ification might confuse us into forgetting it's a food to consume rarely.
Whole grains have all of the parts of the original kernel -- bran, germ and endosperm -- in the original proportions, explains
Meet Ella Nemova, the Founder and Chief Faux Gras-preneur of The Regal Vegan, an artisan food company in Brooklyn focused on decadent vegan treats. Her opinions are fiery, and her suggestions eye-opening.
From Mother Nature Network's Jenni Grover: The Western diet is rich in highly processed, simple carbohydrates. White bread
A new study from the Harvard School of Public Health identified 545 grain products, looked at them through five different whole-grain criteria, and evaluated which criterion best measures the healthfulness of the product.
They identified 545 grain products from two major U.S. grocers, then collected nutrition content and ingredient lists, and
With the low-carb movement, so many clients that I counsel fear eating grains and starches altogether, and think they are better off without them. This is false! Many grains -- whole grains -- are indeed healthy and should be included as part of a healthy diet.
Like it or not, we tend to believe whatever we are exposed to in the media and in advertisements. In nutrition, this usually means that as a society we all follow the same diet fads, glorifying some foods over others in the quest for better health.
I've never been a fan of low-carb diets: Our bodies and our brains need carbohydrates to work effectively. Of course, not all carbohydrates are created equal. Here are six "great" carbs to keep in your diet.
Myth: Dairy makes you fat Cutting dairy just shoots you in the foot (and fat cells). Combined with calorie control, a dairy