Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

An Oregon theater producer claims that Edward Albee's estate refused to grant him the rights to present "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" with a black actor.
Actors Silverman and Dellapina, who plays guitar and sings nicely along the way, perform well together, and Westrate has some effective stretches. If on arrival he were to play Nate as less immediately psychotic, Ziegler's script might have a more insinuating dramatic arc.
Louise strolls into Jonathan's apartment, awkward and exhausted. She's still wearing her white lab coat from work. In fact, she almost never takes it off. It's her good luck charm, her safety blanket that gets her through days of sexually stimulating rats for research.
Snowbound in the Big Apple? Try a bite of your favorite Warren Beatty flicks. Get out your DVD collection or surf Netflix. Here are mine. Agree or disagree. What are yours?
"Closer" "Silkwood" From start to finish, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is a non-stop adrenaline injection of the powerful
If you go by several adamant playwrights, it's a terrible idea for married couples to get together over an after-hours drink or dinner or for a casual weekend or a serious discussion about children. Nothing good ever comes of it.
Intense feelings of affection are on our radar as we celebrate Valentine's Day. We turn to the cinematic mirror for understated romcoms -- those that illustrate some underlying dynamics of the relationships that survive versus those that fizzle before death do us part.
Proof of love is on our radar as Valentine's Day nears. Hope, grief, courage and reconciliation, how has the cinematic mirror portrayed relationships that survive while others fizzle before death-do-us part?
I've seen over half a dozen Macbeths over the course of my career. We're going to have Romeo and Juliet running off-Broadway the same time it is running on Broadway. I'm often asked: Why? Yes, they are Shakespeare classics. But do people really want to see them again and again?
If McCarter Theater Artistic Director and Resident Playwright Emily Mann's acceptance speech at the Tonys for Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike as best play was gracious, so also were the circumstances under which she came to give it.
I feel pretty confident that my favorite play of the year, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, will win Best Play and my favorite musical, Matilda, will win Best Musical. (There is a groundswell of support for Kinky Boots.)
Anyone who's been married for any length of time should be able to enjoy Richard Linklater's Before Midnight, if squirming in your seat can be considered a form of enjoyment.
It's been two years since the legendary Elizabeth Taylor died of congestive heart failure at the age of 79. The classic Hollywood
The producers of the NBC hit, SMASH should give James Latus a call to learn how it's done.
Some of you still want to give the last minute gift of theater tickets. It is always hard to recommend theater for people you do not know, but this season I have some generic recommendations for all.
The Broadway grosses have recently told me two things. First, Kathie Lee Gifford is not a very good salesperson. Second, not everyone in the world is going to see Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, even though everyone in the world should be.
It seemed a delicious idea, seeing Edward Albee's Tony award-winning play, Talking Back at Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf about George and Martha, a university couple whose marriage unravels over cocktails with a younger couple one night -- with an audience of couples counselors.
Thanks to the incredible performances by Tracy Letts and Amy Morton, George and Martha are each other's equals. Both loathing and longing for each other, the two continue to battle until all punches are pulled, all secrets exposed and this exhausting and invigorating production's curtain has fallen.
Will everyone who saw the original production of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? please raise his or her hand? Just what I expected: Not that many hand-raisers left to acknowledge their presence at an historic theater event.