widowed

I will share with you my own emotional roller coaster of a year after widowhood, so you will better understand your widowed
"Joy can exist in the exact same spot as your grief."
The harsh reality is, it takes two committed adults to sustain a marriage. It breaks my heart each time I work with someone
After his funeral, I read nearly every academic journal article, book or magazine piece about grief and loss that I could
Well-meaning people would say things like, "Well, you don't look like a widow." Even friends that I saw on a regular basis, would say things like, "Oh, I expected you to look different." It was as if people thought widowhood would transform me into an old hag.
I could pretend, but that pretending cost me. I could be reasonable, but telling that lie was exhausting. Now, when I read about grief, when I attend conferences that talk about grief, I think about those early days. I think about being reasonable. I think of how ridiculous that is.
The letters were written in 1968. I was 17. They are stream-of-consciousness letters from the late sixties. Love letters.
Father's Day, 2001. A day that did not start out well. A day on which I had never felt more or completely alone. You see, by the time Father's Day 2001 arrived, I had been widowed for all of five months. As if that were not enough, my own father died two weeks prior to Father's Day.
There is another arena where 'armchair quarterbacks' also exist -- except this time, those who sit in the metaphorical armchairs have the ability and occasionally, the actual desire to wreak havoc, cause pain and outright destroy relationships.