William F. Buckley

Loving misses this component of the story. I had watched with horror when Buckley held a press conference with Edgar upon
"When he looks at a glass, he is mesmerized by its reflection."
Based on his record, he is not the American people's voice, nor this nation's. In this election season, as it has always been, Donald J. Trump's voice is just his own.
en.wikipedia.org Where Jack had close friends in the black community and generally projected an image of tolerance far beyond
National Review editor Rich Lowry is now leading an effort urging conservatives to speak out against Donald Trump and oppose his candidacy.
While the documentary shows Kramer in robust health and, later in life, as a frail senior citizen, it teaches viewers what can happen when one fiercely intelligent man (who is not willing to take "no" for an answer) speaks truth to power.
What William F. Buckley and Gore Vidal did for discourse in America was unprecedented. They proved there was a time not so long ago we relished hearing both sides of political arguments. And there is a time -- call it the present -- when a hunger for authenticity seems to be driving both parties in unexpected directions.
I've been saying its like a forest fire of redwoods. If the redwoods were burning, that's them (Buckley and Vidal). And what networks took away was the flame. And that it's devolved into flash paper. Not even any ash. No content, just the explosion.
Stevan Riley's achievement in making a biopic about a great subject, Marlon Brando, who, despite having died in 2004, nevertheless comes fully alive in his own voice. Brando's life was complicated.
"Best of Enemies" is an extraordinarily timely, provocative, powerful, poignant and important film. But its overarching themes are so subtle that the film is not about what you think it is about and you will not comprehend its magnitude until the final sixty seconds and closing credits.