William Golding

In 1954, a single book destroyed the popular notion that children are innocent souls. In that book, a plane of such innocent
There was once a man who lived in Dadri, an Indian town in Northwest Uttar Pradesh. Most people in Dadri are Hindu, but Mohammad Akhlaq was Muslim. One night, after he had gone to bed, one hundred men stormed his house, dragged him into the street, and stoned him to death.
In all my theater-going days, I don't remember seeing a production that would likely give me nightmares. The thought had never crossed my mind. Until, that is, I went to the Pleasance Company and witnessed The Curing Room, David Ian Lee's import from the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.
War. Death. Despair. Oppression. Environmental ruin. Yup, when it comes to demoralizing literature, dystopian novels have it all! Yet many of us love this genre, and there are good reasons we do.
Everyone knows that you’re not supposed to judge a book by its cover, but um, we kind of do it all the time. In fact, half
"Lolita," for instance, is now "Likable Rapists." It makes you think that perhaps these new titles are what censors out there really see.
The Nobel laureate Sir William Golding, whose novel Lord of the Flies turned notions of childhood innocence on their head
Shadowy non-state actors contemplate flattening an American city with a device smuggled into the United States at one hundred possible ports of entry.