william kristol

There is much about Donald Trump that deserves to be criticized. On foreign policy, however, his at times unsophisticated formulations reflect far greater common sense than possessed by his political opponents and establishment critics.
An insurrectionist presidential candidate stuns his party's establishment by pocketing the party's nomination. His views do not line up with mainstream figures in his party.
It carries big ramifications for American politics, the Middle East, and relations between the Islamic world and the West. Most everything will be more inflamed, not least the Iranian nuclear controversy and the future of Palestine. And of course American politics.
The muck in question isn't even Democratic muck. It's purely conservative and Republican mudslinging, at a person who used to be put on a pretty tall pedestal in Republicanland: Sarah Palin.
Here's a prediction: 13 months from now, when the voters of Iowa and New Hampshire begin voting for presidential candidates, Americans will be even more weary of nearly 15 years of war, and U.S. intervention will be even less popular than it is now.
If there can be an argument made that neoconservative rhetoric directly led to the downward spiral of American and Iraqi lives, as well as the decline of our country, then a court somewhere in the U.S. should look into a criminal case.
Long before Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl could ever have put his fellow soldiers in danger, certain people advocated policies that would put millions of American soldiers in harm's way.
Wieseltier's most heretical statements in the weeks preceding the Kiev congress declared that the United States is as weak as Putin's Russia is evil, owing mainly to the misleadership of Obama.
Instead of acknowledging their deepest feelings openly, or even to themselves, the writers I've mentioned who've brought so much folly and destruction upon their republic, are doubling down, more nervous and desperate than ever, looking for someone else to blame.