william mcraven

Despite what the progressive left might think, Elizabeth Warren is not an ideal running mate. In addition to giving up a Senate seat, combining Clinton and Warren could be like oil and vinegar.
As the battle against extremists widens, the U.S. is relying on special operations forces more than ever.
University of Texas System Chancellor William McRaven circulated a letter to state lawmakers this week warning that a pending
President Obama was right when he said "democracy demands" that all wars must end. Last month, he reaffirmed he wants to move America "off a permanent war footing" in his State of the Union address. Now is the time for senior Pentagon officials to explain the steps they'll take to get us there.
"Suffice to say that there is going to be a kind of conventional effort, to train their conventional forces, between 5 and
Last weekend, in the midst of all the tumult over the debacle that is the federal government shutdown, came word of these two dramatic US special operations forces raids against jihadist leaders in Libya and Somalia.
It is becoming increasingly clear that the United States has allowed its infatuation with unconventional warfare conducted by Special Forces, and unconventional technology as exemplified by drones, to drive assessment of what we need to do and what we should do.
The daring raid that took down Osama bin Laden was a triumph of American arms, satisfying retribution for al Qaeda's attacks on New York and Washington. But it points up the many mistakes we've made and continue to make in the wake of 9/11.
These units like Special Forces, Delta Force, SEALs, and Rangers often operate outside the chain of command and, as they become institutionally stronger, tend to dominate military decision-making.
More military capability equates to more security for the United States. This precept is so deeply embedded in our minds that no one sees a need to state it. Yet it may be false.