Williamsburg, Brooklyn

A unique array of short films are headed to Brooklyn's Nitehawk Shorts Festival this fall.
As soon as Gene Coffey rolls up the ink-black metal gate at his tony tattoo parlor, he starts talking about his art studio.
I was first introduced to Moses Hoskins by Eileen Costello, Ph.D. in 1995. He resided in NYC for seven years at that time, having moved from Iowa in 1988, as his art had already caught the eye of a few serious art professionals. This was a time of a vastly changing art scene in New York.
People have come and gone, but the subway lines are still running, on the same routes on the same tracks, among all those ghosts of happy times past.
Although I am beginning to assimilate more into the hipster lifestyle of Williamsburg by virtue of living here since early Fall, I was a bit intimidated to walk into a small local theater for fear that I would immediately be spotted as an intruder and inherent lover of the main land.
A stroll through any number of Brooklyn neighborhoods quickly confirms that the borough remains the most dynamic location in the country for independent shops, and a hotbed for the designers and makers whose wares make up their inventory.