Wishful thinking

So on my ultimate dream trip, you'll find me dipping down into the small towns I love with their mom and pop shops and town squares built around a stately old courthouse.
I don't normally read much fantasy or science fiction, so I was pleasantly surprised by Wishful Thinking, Kamy Wicoff's debut novel, which contains a bit of both. And while I certainly know what it is to be way too busy, and to wish you could be in two places at one time, I'm not a mother and I don't even own a smart phone.
A hands-on doctor tries to get public officials to recognize infestations as bubonic and pneumonic plagues. Can a novel's depictions inform discussions about Ebola?
The only thing perfect is our imagination. It's good to leave it that way. Expectations tend to lead to huge let downs. The truth is, it's likely your life is missing much more than just one thing to make it flawless.
While words and thoughts do create positive or negative energy in your life, it's not only the words, but the feeling you have about them and the context in which they are said that's most important.
Wishful thinking is usually an outgrowth of a fear. People don't resort to wishful thinking because it works. They resort to wishful thinking because it allows them to avoid confronting their fear. Wishful thinking allows you to avoid discomfort, stress, change, anxiety and pressure.
There is a powerful lot of wishful thinking going on about the American economy these days, starting at the very top.
There is no basis at present for believing that medical interventions based on postulated but not-yet-realized nanobots will perform their duties without the side-effects associated with every other therapeutic agent ever employed.
I believe we need to place trust in one another and create community-based responses to climate change, whole or piecemeal, in the face of constraints that are bound to grow over time.