WMDs

Banned under international law, chemical weapons are still making it onto the battlefield today. This is how their use developed throughout the 20th Century, before being deployed in Syria.
Jackie and Dunlap on Colin Powell's email hack. Dunlap can't quit saying "dicking bimbos." But then, neither can you, probably. Also: Trump, Hillary, Bush, goats, Dr. Oz, Colin Kaepernick.
Recently Donald Trump broke with the Republican convention and roiled the party base by boldly stating "You call it whatever you want. I want to tell you. They [the Bush administration] lied."
One hopes that the recent events in Paris (at a time when ISISphobia has replaced Francophobia) will begin the process of forging a new trans-Atlantic sense of solidarity with America's historic enemy and perhaps remove some of the allure of French-bashing among the American Right.
This is perhaps the greatest legacy of 9/11 and the two wars it spawned. A nation that, whiled honoring its dead, seeks to preserve more of its fighting men and women from being sent into harm's way to die for dubious causes.
Former Vice President Dick Cheney is trying hard to salvage his legacy, so he is resorting to spin, distortion and lies. But why is the media paying attention to him?
We're told that Syria is much different than Iraq. If the word 'wolf' comes to mind, ignore it. These are the same people that wanted to attack Iran less than a year ago because they were eerily close to a nuclear weapon.
We're Americans, aren't we? We're the good guys. Our traditional role is to rein in the bad guys, like Iran, isn't it?
Ten years ago today the U.S. invaded Iraq with the goals of toppling Saddam Hussein, destroying its weapons of mass destruction (WMDs), and freeing its people. Now, a decade later, Hussein is dead, but no WMDs were ever found, and the country has devolved into a de facto civil war.
When Secretary of State Colin Powell spoke to the U.N. Security Council on February 5, 2003, countless journalists in the United States extolled him for a masterful performance.
Why is the federal government so interested in a rail-thin octogenarian? The answer can be found in Bangor 5, which follows the federal case against five unlikely "commandos" who executed a bold and daring break-in at one of America's most highly sensitive military installations.
This week, the State Department sent a diplomatic demarche to Syria's neighbors Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia, warning
It took the greatest military alliance in history five months to push the Libyan rebels across the finish line. Nevertheless, Western politicians are claiming victory.
Even though we may not have as many heroic, truth-teller journalists as we did in Vietnam, there is one thing not available then. The Internet.
While the U.S. is seeking to find allies who might arrest Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, there are other stories out there that they should be worrying about. One is Pat Tillman.
Hiroshima was our original sin, and we are still paying for it, even if most Americans don't know it. That's why I always urge everyone to study the history surrounding the decision to use the bomb and how the full story was covered up for decades.
The following letter, by a former US intelligence officer, was sent in response to Thomas Powers's review of Robert Jervis's
Obama knows that there is no winning outcome for the US and its allies if he chooses a military course with Iran, even if some of his team seem to enjoy flirting with that option.
Today, Joe Biden may have helped push a new "global social contract" on international security and safety a bit further by hosting personally at his private residence a unique lunch with the non-aligned state leaders.
Pitt researchers have created a material that can neutralize some effects of chemical and biological weapons. Researchers