wolf hall

Read the full interview with Eaton on TheEditorial.com where Heidi Legg interviews visionary voices around her from Cambridge
For me, this has been an interesting year of travels, adventures in distant lands, and new experiences. Wherever I have gone, though, I've taken the opportunity to explore theatre and musical performances, film, art exhibits, and the most intriguing books.
Facing a crowd that included his mother and brother as well as Tony Danza, next up for a run at the Café Carlyle, Alan Cumming reminded everyone that he would be hosting the Tony Awards with Kristen Chenoweth on Sunday night, admitting that he was "freaking out."
But this was an unusually interesting night at the Morgan, the eve of the PEN gala, and many in the room were slated to attend the writers' annual dinner that would honor Charlie Hebdo's Gerard Biard and Jean-Baptiste Thoret accepting the Freedom of Expression Courage Award on behalf of the magazine.
Broadway to many means big dance numbers and actors hurtling outsized emotions into the rafters. While there are certainly plenty of tiresome revivals and knockoffs alike that make an all too vivid case for this, there are also bold producers remaking the landscape of commercial theater with subversive, challenging and deeply moving musicals and plays.
I found every aspect of the play compelling. The costumes are beautiful and the simple stark set helps all the more to feature the story and characters, portrayed by a remarkable ensemble of nearly two dozen actors.
No matter the color of their hats, the four Thomases were pivotal figures in English history, as they oversaw the country’s
Wolf Hall, based upon historic fiction by Hilary Mantel, focuses on the period in his reign when the king, smitten with the sexy Anne Boleyn, concocts a strategy for ridding himself of his wife of 18 years, Catherine of Aragon.
In Wolf Hall, an engrossing two-part stage adaptation of Hilary Mantel's novels on the life of Thomas Cromwell and the reign of King Henry VIII, a turning point in history is vividly brought to life.
There's a rip-roaring, malevolently Machiavellian, viciously nasty, blood-letting saga of intrigue and incest on view just now. No, not in the cloistered cloakrooms of the U.S. House of Representatives; no incest there, presumably.
The fantastic “Wolf Hall” is ultra-English is so many ways: It re-tells the foundational tale of Cromwell, Anne Boleyn and
What is it like to finish a novel? The first time you do it, you feel utter euphoria, and you should. Unfortunately, what follows isn't always instant acceptance by an agent, an editor, or even your beta readers and friends.
I just finished Bring up the Bodies -- and, lo and behold, look who won the Man Booker Prize again?
Wolf Hall is a fine read for the enthusiast of English history, then, and one that rewards the reader patient enough to submit to its length.
In Bring Up the Bodies, the sequel to the Booker Prize-winning Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel weaves a richly textured world that is at once deeply foreign and entirely relevant.
Judging historical fiction is not as simple as 'accurate equals good' and 'inaccurate equals bad'. It depends on whether
Today is Bastille Day, when France celebrates the storming of the notorious Parisian jail, which set its revolution in motion
The novelist Hilary Mantel added another literary award to her NBCC and Booker prizes when Wolf Hall won the inaugural Walter