Wolf Of Wall Street

U.S. authorities allege that the movie "Wolf of Wall Street" may have been made with laundered money from Malaysia.
The DOJ alleges that a production company used millions stolen from a sovereign wealth fund to finance "The Wolf of Wall Street."
Andrew Greene claims he was defamed in the film and is suing Paramount Pictures for more than $50 million.
No one has met the starting bid of $12,000 yet. Such a tragedy.
All the '80s you could ask for. What could be more '80s than a mashup of "The Wolf of Wall Street," a film about the financial
And movies: For movies, "The Wolf of Wall Street" and "Frozen" were the two most-pirated films of the year. Each was downloaded
We threw the question out to Facebook, what things do men do in bed that us women hate? The answers we got back were sometimes
My TV and movie selections for the majority of my life have tended to be relatively juvenile. So recently, I've been making an effort to watch "real people movies" and "grown-up shows." Through this personal cinematic transformation, I've noticed a trend in the shows and films I've been introduced to.
Screen Junkies got its [passé Internet slang of choice goes here] on to bring you one more supercut of "The Wolf of Wall
You see, this is actually a critique of the trend of the open letter, in all of its asinine inescapability. #Sorrynotsorry, dear reader -- it's the nature of the open letter to trick you into reading it.
"Witness Scorsese break out every Scorseseism in the book. Like, a f--kton of tracking shots, f--king voiceover, f--king
In The McConaissance, McConaughey has become not an anti-hero, but an anti-matinee idol.
It's now been nearly 18 hours since the last Academy Award was handed out, which makes it an old story in today's hyper-accelerated news cycle. But here's a final observation -- a question, really -- before Sunday night's relatively unmemorable gala fades from memory forever. Why were the only two films to deal with financial scams also the two surprise shut-outs of the night?
Matthew McConaughey has reinvented himself as a serious actor, launching himself out of the chick flick ghetto and into Oscar territory with Dallas Buyers' Club. But what we want to know is how has his characters' approach to love and sex changed over the years.
Hollywood elite donned their designer gowns and tuxes as they lauded themselves for exposing the grotesque and horrifying excess of Belfort's world. And then did what? Retreated back into their relatively modest and understated lives?
Heading into Oscar night, "12 Years a Slave" was tangled in a tight race with Alfonso Cuaron's "Gravity" and David O. Russell's
It seems to me that this tendency to excuse libertine excesses by talented people inverts our moral hierarchy, since it basically says that those whom we acclaim as best are excused for acting the worst.