women and aging

"The only thing that's withering over time is the tired, outdated way society has been treating older women."
The 20's are about experimenting and finding ourselves. Women at this age are open to new experiences, new friendships and
I'd noticed lately that men no longer seemed to notice me when I was in the grocery store line, or even out on the town, but it didn't truly hit me how bad the situation had become until one recent morning at Starbucks.
You find yourself waking up on a Tuesday, soaking wet in your own stress sweat, screaming "Ahhh, it's April and I don't even have a 401k and I just downloaded my third dating app of the week and now i'm supposed to turn another year older?"
How can we tell our daughters (and granddaughters) to be proud of exactly who they are if we ourselves are afraid to admit to something as rudimentary as our date of birth?
I have walked and stood and moved with my legs for an estimated 10 hours a day, which means I have used my legs for 171,550 hours in my lifetime. These legs have moved me to new cities, up mountains and down streets winding through places new and old.
What if actresses could stop shaving years as regularly as they do their legs? What if the only numbers that mattered on our resumes referred to how long we stayed at one place? What if we could love without worrying about the birth dates of potential partners?
And, finally, some awesome perks of being 30? No. More. Ikea. Oh, and zero f*cks given. (If you're reading this on your phone
We heard from women in their 70s on our blog at 70candles.com and in 70candles discussion groups across the country, from New York to Texas. With decades of life ahead for many of us, it's a great time to reassess our lives and examine our options. Here are the topics that matter most to women in their 70s.
Because we're reluctant to talk about our own vanity-driven alterations, we tend to want to dismiss and condemn those of others. The real objection to Zellweger's new face isn't that she has one. The objection is that we can't pretend it didn't happen.
Forty has answered many -- most? -- of the big questions that haunted my young adulthood. Forty is about embracing the reality that those answers have built.
The place I'd like to hit the "pause" button is not on my menses, which I've never minded much and will miss when the egg factory closes down for good, but on our society's terror of human aging, fragility and change.
I am not menopausal, nor have I gone through menopause, so I obviously don't know what is in store for me, but if the experience of those nearest and dearest to me is any indication, it is unlikely to be a fun fest.
Accepting our aging is an act of love towards ourselves; an act of grace, generosity and freedom to the people we care about; and a welcome offering of humility to the world.
Sporting a rhinestone top and hot pants, her feet barely fitting into her glittering, impractical heels, Mrs. Longstreet would embark on her morning shopping trip. As this Suburban Gypsy Rose Lee strutted down the frozen food aisle for her big number, her flesh sagged like a flag at half-mast.
We condemn the pressure placed on our daughters to be and look perfect. And then, we place almost the same pressures upon ourselves to be forever young, to repel the forces of aging and to glean our sense of self from our faces rather than our lives.
Whenever Miss Universe 1997 Brook Lee shows up, there are always laughs and life lessons. Watch as Brook talks with me about beauty and aging -- and how to age beautifully.
Q. Is there really nothing we can do to stop breasts from losing their oomph? A. It's not a bad idea to wear a supportive
[H/T @sphericalfruit via Sociological Images] However, Diaz and Cruz look like poreless, plastic dolls. (Spoiler alert: These