women and leadership

Most of my weekends are spent doing errands, exercising, watching movies, visiting with friends and catching up on sleep.
The truth is that the world today is new and unpredictable and changing, and filled with threats that we don't understand. But dismissing a powerful Mom or sucking up to an omnipotent Father does nothing but create an illusion of control.
Leadership as we have known it is going the way of landlines and yellow pages. The familiar pyramid of power is shape-shifting into a circle as female leaders summon their teams, harvest their stories, surface their wisdom, and succeed in their business.
When I was 11, my family visited Washington, D.C., and the absolute highlight of the trip was a tour of FBI Headquarters. I asked the guide a question. "Can girls be FBI agents?" His response: "No, because girls would spend all their time painting their nails."
An increasing drumbeat of data is suggesting that women summon the courage to lean in, only to be knocked back. Meanwhile, a generation of girls is still getting the message that confident self-expression is the answer.
More and more women are becoming leaders in business and politics in this country, and as leaders, it is vital to be prepared, educated and equipped for the task at hand.
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg says that little girls who are told they are "bossy" should be told instead that they have "leadership potential." Ms. Sandberg's intentions are good, but she's confused about what being "bossy" really means. Her campaign to "Ban Bossy" is misguided and misses the mark.
There is more to a female leader than a loud (perceivably bossy) voice. There's real depth, experience and intuition.
After investing as much as $250,000 in tuition, why would fathers watch proudly as their daughters graduate from college, and then expect them only to work for a year or two before exiting the workforce to raise a family?
In other words, no matter the tune, men and women sing it differently and Katy Perry, as it turns out, can remind us of five ways to stay on key.