Women Deliver

As this wild year draws to a close, I can't help but reflect on resilience, find strength in solutions, and feel fired up
“Even though the clitoris has been removed, that doesn’t stop us from having full capacity of pleasure."
To those attempting to evaluate we caution that measuring the effect of a community-based intervention is not straightforward
We urge the G7 nations to show leadership and to make political and financial commitments to Universal Health Coverage at their upcoming summit in Japan. This would be a clear signal from the most powerful economies that "business as usual" will not do if the world is serious about implementing the SDGs.
Whether you're a world leader who can increase investment in girls, a business that can change your equal pay policies or a person who can directly lobby your government decision-maker to change an unequal law -- now is the time to act and invest in girls and women.
The Gates Foundation has committed $80 million to gathering robust and reliable data.
This week, international leaders from all sectors of society convene in Copenhagen for the Women Deliver 2016 Conference.
As Sarah finished her remarks, I sat frozen and overwhelmed by a sensation both profound and penetrating: a true sense of awe, and the recognition that I was in the presence of an extraordinary soul -- the strongest and most courageous person I'd ever encountered.
Going to school shouldn't have to be an act of bravery. Girls -- and boys -- should be able to attend schools free from discrimination, intimidation or threats to their safety. As Pakistani advocate
The 2015 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) generated unprecedented political will and funding for girls' and women's health and rights. Unfortunately though, the MDGs are quickly coming to an end just when we are beginning to gain momentum.
The rallying cry for girls' education, ending early marriage and pregnancies, and preventing gender-based violence is resonating with a more global and diverse audience than ever before.
Unmet need for contraception is greatest for women under the age of 20 and, in the world's poorest countries, one in three women has a child before the age of 18.
I once heard someone say that art is a reflection of your soul, so if you are creating art about another culture, make sure your soul is right.
17. Marie Stopes Foundation -- Marie Stopes Foundation is the leading reproductive and sexual health care provider for both
May was a great month for showcasing the centrality of women to every single goal on the international agenda for development and poverty eradication. Dare I call it a watershed moment? It depends on what happens next.
I know our agenda is demand-driven. More than 200 million women in the developing world want access to contraception that they cannot get.
Women, particularly in developing countries, face numerous challenges, including sexual violence, limited access to health resources, barriers to education, and inadequate economic opportunities.
Life for women and girls in Jamaica has seen recent improvements in terms of education and job opportunities, but the health situation is complicated. Many pregnant mothers live in rural areas and do not receive consistent antenatal care. Child mortality has dropped in recent years, and so has the rate of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, but maternal mortality is still a problem.