women filmmakers

Xaque Gruber: Gretchen, you have done a great job with Arclight Cinema's Women In Entertainment Summit. Congratulations on
When we're finally recognized or achieve the improbable, I'm going to celebrate. And I'm going to post a photo to show what is possible. Don't feel left out because your demographic doesn't have a parade or a hashtag: the very fact that you don't need one shows you're already included.
There are not only women but many men, working behind the scenes in the industry, at festivals, to make sure women's contributions to cinema are not overlooked, nor, in the case of Ida Lupino, forgotten. It is because of a personal commitment to include and highlight women's accomplishments in film that the director of the Fribourg International Film festival focused the majority of the festival on films by and about women.
Cinema is no doubt an elitist form of art -- and then you get this black woman, daughter of a housemaid, saying she wants to become a director. It was definitely difficult.
TARA: After the birth of my daughter my eyes opened to the opportunities (and lack there of) for her in the future. This
It's an exciting moment for women filmmakers. After decades struggling for recognition, there's acute awareness of inequity and invisibility. But while enjoining corporate entertainment to include us, we continue to express our own voices and visions on our own.
American filmmaker and writer Maya Forbes has quietly been building her way to critically-acclaimed work that matters.
Whether you believe in miracles, have faith in the power of coincidence or simply agree that life is just a series of open doors for us to explore, the story of WOVEN and the film makers is one that will inspire you to believe in the power of dreams.
In Nov. 2014 I attended the American Film Market for the first time. And I realized that as challenging as "producing" Paid
These films are fascinating and should be required viewing for anyone interested in the history of the seventh art and how much work there still is to be done.
Faith, trust and the courage to live as the person you know yourself to be all come into play in Karolina Bielawska's moving, award-winning documentary Call Me Marianna. The film has been turning heads at film festivals around the world.
Created and hosted by ArcLight's Executive Vice President Gretchen McCourt, the Women In Entertainment Summit will feature keynotes by Academy Award winner Geena Davis, founder of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, and Women In Film President Cathy Schulman.
Millennials have a bad reputation. The media tells us they are entitled, spoiled and in constant need of approval. But I agree with James Wolcott who wrote; "We may need millennials to remind us what we should have remembered from the '60s, that social change comes only once you stop playing charades."
I have to recognize, I knew almost nothing about the tragedy that happened almost 30 years ago in Chernobyl, Ukraine. The nuclear power plant accident was catastrophic, and its effects on the population were beyond human comprehension.
If there is one film that changed my life, it's Nadine Labaki's Caramel. It is the kind of movie I can watch again and again, and still find hidden within it new gems of wisdom and insights.
Once a restauranteur of high end restaurants and clubs, currently a prominent film producer, Farsi is also the founder of the philanthropic Mohammed S. Farsi Foundation, named after his father, which helps support education, health development and the arts all over the world -- and now this new program at UCLA.
Unfortunately, it's not only Western audiences that have grown to believe these absurd stereotypes, but the Arab world has started down a path that now seems hell bent on destruction.
Oscar's snub of DuVernay is part of a historical continuum where black directors and women of critically acclaimed films have been routinely denied Best Director nominations.
Jesse Wilson What would happen if you used the tools of theater to create a transformational shift in the way you move through
Two sisters Jessica and Jennica Carmona teamed up to film the coming of age story of Millie -- a young Latina struggling in El Barrio who is mentored by a former Young Lord Mateo to uplift herself and fight for social justice.