women in power

Women leaders have taken corporations and other organizations to new heights, yet women represent too small a percentage of leaders overall. This implored us to ask: what challenges do ambitious women in the workplace often face and how do we move more women forward into leadership roles?
Will voters choose a president based on gender? Or on the issues?
Do you ever wonder if you sometimes keep yourself small because you are afraid of your actual power? Do you ever wonder if you silence yourself and mute your opinion so that you will be "likeable" and not mistaken for a "bitch"? Do you ever wonder what it would be like to actually own your power?
Nope, Hillary wasn't the first. Before her there was Victoria C. Woodhull. I hear you asking, "Victoria who?" Most people haven't ever heard of this 19th century female suffrage icon, but she was a revolutionary woman before her time. Here are seven things she can teach us about being strong, modern women.
As we celebrate Women's History Month, we must acknowledge the great strides that women have achieved in politics. But if we are ever going to build Latina political power, Latina leaders need the same political encouragement and support that men oftentimes take for granted.
Unless you live under a rock and have never heard the answer to Beyonce’s infamous, “Who run the world?!” question, we’ll
Michelle Bachelet, President of Chile, rightly stated: "When one woman is a leader, it changes her. When more women are leaders, it changes politics and policies."
Agapi Stassinopoulos joins HuffPost Live to explain why women need to stop second guessing themselves.
What we know: Having women in the boardroom is a good thing. But are more women a better thing? That depends, of course, on how they get there.
The main problem is that there are currently not many women holding significant positions, making it harder for young women to find role models.