women in the church

What would it mean for Catholic women to be able to serve at the altar as deacons? Here's what these women had to say.
These leading ladies share their thoughts on what feminism means in a religious context.
This idea that Jesus chose poor, uneducated men as his disciples is entrenched in evangelistic teaching, and was something I heard often growing up in the church, especially during the Easter season. But is this really true?
As we observe Holy Week, we are reminded that women were the ones who stood by the cross and were first to preach the Good News of Christ's resurrection. Throughout the Scriptures, women have played a significant role in contributing to the kingdom of God.
I think about women in the church every day. Every day! Not because I want to be a pastor, or an elder, or a deacon. But because I am stunned by the insulting way many mainstream churches treat women. And I am shocked that it is so widely accepted.
Avoiding the "F" word wasn't a conscious decision on my part. Rather, I accepted the game that was in place. I sized things up from the standpoint of what I needed to do to succeed. I learned the rules and played as well as I could. That all changed on December 5, 2000.
Because of feminism, church stages and spotlights are often dominated by women. Men are encouraged to just serve in the nursery or kitchen. Sometimes men are even told to stay silent in church.
With all due respect to the spectacular new pontiff, (and he is spectacular), a sinner is not who I am, or for that matter, who he is. Or anyone.
Throughout his discourse there was none of the clinical, distancing talk of gays and lesbians as “objectively disordered
A bad choice could set back the cause of the Church's renewal even more. A mediocre choice will only ensure that the Church continues to wallow in the current woes. A truly wise, visionary choice will lead the transformation of the Church to ensure its vitality for generations to come.
I can't help but think that part of the Good News I'm called to share is this: the Church does not hate vaginas. Even better, God certainly doesn't. Of that I'm certain.
When editor Gloria Steinem invited a male to write a cover story for Ms. magazine, I was him.
Along with Christmas, Advent is the glorious and only time of year when Christians across the theological spectrum can agree on women's participation in God's work.
Is it true? Is it a fake? Should we care? If Jesus was married, would it overturn the patriarchy that for 2,000 years kept women out of ordained leadership? Would it allow men to be married and ordained in the Catholic Church?
Silence -- especially the enforced silence of women -- does no one any good, least of all the church. Women's voices desperately need to be beard.
Whatever the sisters might have done to cross invisible lines of vowed obedience according to Church rules, they have done so with courage and conviction. They deserve reverence, not retribution.
My Christian sisters and brothers, let us revive the struggle. This fabulous sport can be our guide as we strive this Advent season, expectantly awaiting the New Born King.
I remember telling a vacation bible school teacher that "I was trying to decide between being a minister or a jet pilot." She smiled and said, "Well, girls can be jet pilots, but God only calls men to preach."