women's fiction

Gage's style is direct and engaging and her many years as an artist brings a verisimilitude to her work. She gives insightful
My grandmother was a librarian, and my parents are both voracious readers, so all my life I've been surrounded by stacks
The only background I will give is this: Annabeth is a 34-year-old hopeless romantic who is still struggling to find her soul mate. She decides that rather than waiting for him to come to her, she's going to do everything she can to try to find him, including using a fictional online dating site, which is the genesis for this column.
On the heels of the release of my new novel, SOME WOMEN, I have a confession to make. Until two years ago, I hadn't exercised in over a decade.
You know, I hadn't planned on returning to the White Clan, but, when you say that, I get these excited little butterflies
I'm addicted to book review porn the way some people ogle real estate ads, vacation brochures, or the latest iPhone gadgets. When I first read the advance reviews of Jennifer Brown's debut novel, Modern Girls, I knew this was a must-read.
If you're an author with aspirations of seeing your work adapted for film or TV, people love to look at you like you're a sad puppy. "Oh, but movies are never as good as the book," they say. But is that really true? Happily, no.
The best writing tip a published author gave me was to make sure I had a new proposal ready to submit right after I turned
What does it mean to forgive in a town so hard and dry that it's called Unforgiven. Ruby Baxter, the protagonist of Marin
The book I found within this cheery package, however -- a thoughtful, elegiac, time- and country-hopping emotional epic about female friendship and mortality -- is, to me, a substantially dark and meditative story that only in moments captures bright joy and breezy romantic ephemera.
"I'd have to say my art imitates my life. I've always been one to throw myself off cliffs. Not because I'm brave, but because I can't stop myself; that's how I learn best."
In Sarah Addison Allen's First Frost, we return to Bascom, North Carolina, and the magical Waverly family first featured in Garden Spells. Addison Allen's books feature a splendid use of magical realism that immerses us into the hearts and minds of her characters. We spoke about the nature of belonging, magic, and writing.
Rather than surrender to the chick-lit label, my fallback approach is to analogize. "Remember Erich Segal's Love Story? It's
Kate Moretti's latest thriller, The Vanishing Year, marks a new transition for the New York Times bestselling author. With this novel, she is moving from a digital/print on demand publisher to a traditional publisher. This process represents one that so many independent and self-publishers dream about -- cracking into the work of traditional publishing.
"Oh, yeah, right," Anne said. "Like that's any fun." But probably the worst rebel among the characters in Folly Cove was
Amy Sue Nathan, author of The Good Neighbor, brings us the story of Elizabeth aka Izzy Lane and her introduction to the worlds of Internet celebrity and dating after divorce.
"I am kind of programmed to help other writers and have been doing that since long before I had an agent or book contract. It inspired me to be around (virtually) other writers, published and not."
"Becoming a writer was not part of my plan. I'd gone to law school to be a lawyer and didn't think I would deviate from that path. But as the saying goes -- We plan, God laughs."
I have been a professional journalist and writer my entire adult life, but self-doubt is very real when you're stepping out of your comfort zone and writing 85,000 words of fiction versus an 800-word essay.
I had the privilege of talking with her about what makes her tick as an author, how she keeps the ideas coming and the power of friendship, romance and love.