women's magazines

The leaves on my maples were teeny-tiny green spots against blue sky two weeks ago. This morning they form a lush blanket of oxygen-expelling softness, hiding my neighbors from sight. Their growth was rapid. Almost dizzying. It was time.
The next day, I found myself sitting in a vintage armchair in the spacious, light-filled, on-street studio storefront of Fioravanti. They make slow clothing and just opened a few weeks ago.
My 41st birthday is Monday. I'm taking myself to Orcas Island for the long weekend because I want to go slow.
I set out last year to create a new kind of magazine for women. One with no advertising that inspires and enlightens, gives voice to the heart, and celebrates true beauty.
Sample copies of Issue Two of Lucia arrived last week. I was so overwhelmed with my day job and the accompanying client communications (emails, deadlines, deliverables) that for a couple of hours I just let the FedEx box sit on my kitchen table. Unopened.
I think the real potential -- the ability to inspire and enlighten -- comes not with the number of followers one has or the size of the audience they reach, but with the meaningful exchanges that can only happen when there is a well-trodden path from one heart to another.
Everything we do creatively has already been done. In fact, someone else is probably doing it right now.
Much of society runs on conspicuous consumption. On top of this, though it may be shifting, women are objectified and taught to self-objectify. Why should I comply to someone else's standard of beauty and why is beauty held on a pedestal as the most sought after value anyway?
I refused to spend any more time or energy investing in someone else's ideas of girl culture or womanhood, not to mention the serious, serious doubts I had about all those sex tips. I decided I no longer wanted to be a part of supporting a culture that capitalizes on girls' self-doubts and insecurities.
Identify a few things that are wrong with your character and attempt, most likely unsuccessfully, to improve them. You're probably insufficiently grateful or a terrible listener. Maybe you're just a selfish harpy who only ever thinks of herself.
Believe that your Twitter/Facebook followers are truly your friends. Invest more time and effort in wooing, and keeping, their approval, meanwhile, dismissing the approval of actual people you've known for years.
I admit that it would be nice to pin our body image hang-ups to one dartboard. It would be super keen if we could lay blame at the feet of the music industry, our seventh grade gym teacher or the guy (and let's face it, it was totally a dude) who invented the tube top.
My daughter's view of herself and her place in this world will first be shaped at home. But the world she encounters online, in television, print and music will also have an influence on her perception of self and others.
When the editor called to say she liked the essay and wanted to buy it, I was convinced it was a friend playing a trick. It wasn't. In fact, the editor wanted to know if I had any other essays to show her.
Sophia Herbst joins us to talk about her weight-loss blog.
I don't even know how I know of this number. Only that I know it, and my friends know it, and my mom knows it. Somehow, somewhere along the road, I was taught that if I want to have a flat stomach and tight tushy, I need to limit my calories to 1,200 a day and do cardio.
You're the fashion editor of the most-read women's magazine in the U.S. I may not be a huge fan of your content, but as your magazine goes, so goes, to a certain extent, the 18-to-34-year-old female nation. Trends are for everyone. So start one.
If this hilarious parody cover is anything to go by, women's magazines have a long way to go. This mockup of the "average