women's vote

I've come to the conclusion, and it could certainly be skewed, that we are not only the sum total of our experiences, but the product of our interpretation of those experiences. These form the foundation of our beliefs.
Even with a seeming lock on the election, women's groups aren't letting up. Feminist Majority is putting resources into formerly
He is reportedly taking debate advice from accused sexual harasser Roger Ailes.
Donald Trump is still stonewalling on releasing his tax returns, with no sign of a reversal in sight. He obviously doesn't want to reveal how the tax code favors him as a certified one-percenter. But he has no problem bloviating on so-called tax fixes for the nation's majority -- women.
It took 29 female presidential candidates (some running multiple times), 313 female members of Congress, thousands of female
If Trump really loves women and is serious about getting their votes, let us hear his plan to fix a system that doesn't work for moms. The majority of mothers, like fathers, now work outside the home -- they need the money to support their families.
Sorry, John. Female voters are listening carefully -- very carefully -- and women are not stupid. They know doublespeak when they hear it, and they just got an earful of it from you.
As we work to inspire, educate and empower others by integrating women's history as part of the distinctive culture of the United States, we applaud the writers and producers of Suffragette who recognized the need to expand awareness about this significant moment in Britain's history.
As for issues like paid family leave and keeping Social Security intact that would make the lives of women better, Carly Fiorina's campaign statements are resoundingly silent.
Elbowing for the bottom rung has been fierce, but there's plenty of material on those we know will be on the podium. Whether you tune in to the Republican debate or not, know this: No matter who wins, women lose.
Nope, Hillary wasn't the first. Before her there was Victoria C. Woodhull. I hear you asking, "Victoria who?" Most people haven't ever heard of this 19th century female suffrage icon, but she was a revolutionary woman before her time. Here are seven things she can teach us about being strong, modern women.
The fact is, Susan B. Anthony was a remarkable woman, and as February 15th was her birthday, it seems a good time to honor her lifetime of advocating for women's rights by sharing a bit about her in this week's post.
Known by all as the strongest advocate for equal rights for African Americans using non-violence, King has become a giant in the history of the quest for civil liberty and social justice.
As the fastest-growing segment of the nation's largest voting bloc and the most active segment of the emerging majority vote, women of color are a key voting bloc with the power to affect electoral and policy outcomes.
While she does not say at what age the experience switch shifts on, we can guess from her next quip that it must be around the time young women stop receiving messages on Tinder.
Females are the majority of voters, and they're a super-majority when they're joined by men who care about them. Women can control any election, and we'd better make it happen. If not, super-conservative legislative majorities will control our most private decisions.
Ebola-hawking candidates are trying for a bait and switch, but my bet's on women. Voting for someone who plays on Ebola fears while denying female workers a chance at equal pay is a fool's game -- and female voters are not fools.