work life

The first place to look is at your job. Are you happy there? Is there room to grow, or advancements to be made? If you find
"I'm just going to move all these meetings to Monday."
In April 2014, weeks before Mother's Day, the ad agency Mullen Lowe released a powerful video, "World's Toughest Job," to
Can you think of a man at your office or in your industry on whom you can focus as the person you are committed to outpacing? Perhaps it's someone who has been given the promotion you deserved.
There is no secret, pill or magic wand that can be waved to create balance. There aren't 10 questions you can ask yourself that will magically make you balanced. Sorry... it takes work, and a lot of it. It is personal and you must analyze your own needs in order to achieve balance.
No matter how "busy" we get it is imperative that we slow down just enough to relax and regroup on a daily basis. The task of taking care of ourselves first has taken a backseat to being present for others. So let's set the standard right now: Self-care is a must.
Let's save "urgent" for what is truly life-affecting, and shift the conversation to what it's really about: competing priorities. Let's allow space for decoding high-priority tasks and requests, and support an environment of more responding, less reacting.
There is very little an office yoga professional can do when the company culture itself won't allow yoga or meditation into the workplace. It is up to you and an individual to take the time to find your own yoga, often taking great care to do so with the utmost discretion.
Join WorldatWork on October 6, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. for "Rethinking the Workweek," a roundtable
You may think that your desk is an unlikely prop for inner peace, but a chair is a fantastic tool to help you find work-life balance while in the office. Try these simple stress-busting office yoga moves you can do at your desk!
Dads today are much more hands-on and engaged with their children than fathers were a generation ago. The majority want to share parenting responsibilities equally with their spouse but know that their actions are not yet aligned with their aspirations.
When the human-resources staff of a company or organization reaches out to an HR/work-life consultancy, it's usually because they've gotten the green light to implement some kind of change in their organization--culture, flextime, resiliency, etc.