workaholic

Kitt describes how she has finally come to feel successful: How do women measure success? Is it by mothering and having a
Lady daters in NYC can't believe some of the stuff we have to put up with. But after speaking with some of these guys, it seems like we're all kind of in the same boat when it comes to the world of dating.
Over 40 percent of Americans don't take all their paid vacation days and half work beyond the 40-hour week. We talk to former workaholics about how to create a rewarding daily lifestyle and how career changes can play into a good work-life balance.
Companies don't last forever, so you can't expect a job for life anymore. Even the most dedicated workaholic may get a layoff notice when the company decides to downsize.
A workaholic team is often high producing but the unintended consequence is a higher level of burn-out, high illness and absentee rates, etc. -- for the employees and for the leader.
Although I've damn near circumnavigated the globe, I've never been on vacation. Work was always waiting for me when I got somewhere. I'm not complaining because I love what I do. But I rarely took the time to appreciate where I was.
To all the people who are on a first-name basis with the office cleaning crew, are unfazed by empty parking lots on dark nights and can't go more than 20 minutes without checking an email, this one's for you.
Being busy isn't a bad thing as long as it's purposeful, but too many people go from busy, to addicted to busy, to burned out.
I burn the midnight oil, never say no, and I have often prioritized my career over my life and my loved ones. Only recently did I take an honest look in the mirror to realize that life is too short to miss, and every moment is precious. I urge you not to miss the life you deserve to lead.
The problem with work addiction is that many applaud the addict instead of asking if he or she needs help. This applause is the greatest high in the world and makes the addict work harder. This can be deadly.
I thought I had things in balance while my kids were growing up. I was home for dinner, helped with homework, took weekend trips to museums and sporting events. If anything, my heart attack in '89 showed me that I didn't have things quite as balanced as I thought.
Check out the full conversation on workaholism at HuffPost Live HERE. "I had to choose which ding-dong do I want," Kumar
Nisha Moodley runs the women's empowerment website Fierce, Fabulous and Free. But before she reached a state of self-acceptance
When do we ever really listen to our instincts, to that little voice inside saying "what if"? What if this was meaningful?
Looking back, it's obvious that my lifestyle wasn't sustainable. But back then, I wore my workaholism like a badge of honor. The way I saw it, I had an awesome job and would work as hard as it took to do well. Instead, it was a classic case of burnout.
Tim Kreider hates to be busy (his words), and he wants us all to consider why we feel oh-so-busy all the time. A New York
How many of us (myself included) have sat with a car engine running, a few blocks away from "home" reading emails and trying to avoid going home at all? How many of us feel more intimate with email and Internet colleagues we "know" at a safe distance?
Spend a day and maybe an evening watching someone intensely dedicated to their work and it's hard to distinguish between whether the person is exhibiting the symptoms of workaholism or whether they're just living their calling.
Why would we drop the things we're excited about? Why would we let them drop?