worker safety

The "Last Week Tonight" host has the dirt on where your food comes from.
Public health experts call on the president-elect to strengthen the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and protect workers amid the pandemic.
$41,600 in fines, no criminal charges. A plumber’s death in a trench cave-in shows how the country values the lives of workers.
Low-wage workers have been fighting sexual harassment for years. The national conversation is finally catching up with them.
Labor advocates say highlighting abuses is a crucial tool to deter bad employers.
Today is Workers' Memorial Day, a time to remember and honor our fallen brothers and sisters in the labor movement all across the globe. But while technological advancements should be making the workplace safer, deaths and injuries on the job are still a major concern.
Federal agencies doling out billions in contracts for construction projects, nuclear facilities management, weapons disposal, and other high-risk tasks, need to be informed about the records of the corporations vying for those dollars. No lobbyist spin should get in the way of keeping American workers safe.
For too long, many corporations have taken a cavalier attitude to worker safety, but when these corporations are federal contractors paid by U.S. taxpayers, the public demands a special level of accountability.
Even in a company producing "greener" building materials made primarily from recycled cardboard, our workers were exposed to hazardous airborne dust and gases, and handled ingredients whose chemical composition was a mystery to everyone on the factory floor.
The backlash to this incident became a turning point in the history of the US and global labor movements. But 104 years later, it has become clear that too many folks in this country have forgotten the painful lessons of that day.