world-cancer-day

In places like Botswana, a country with the second highest HIV infection rate in the world, the need for access to affordable, effective screening and treatment services -- especially for HIV-positive women -- has spurred the government to take bold action.
Not long ago, a new medical epidemic arose: 'the cancer.' When people started to live longer, their aging bodies began to succumb to this disease we only poorly understood. Looking back, it is clear that much has changed for the better.
Of all of the myths about cancer, I believe one of the most harmful misconceptions today is that cancer is a disease exclusive to wealthy, or developed, countries such as the United States.
Today, World Cancer Day, I am remembering nurse Elyse Bila Ouedraogo. Diagnosed with cervical cancer, she had just returned from Morocco where she had traveled for treatment because of the advanced stage of her disease. I was humbled by her strong spirit.
There have been four myths that have held back cancer care and control in developing countries. On this World Cancer Day, let's start a global pink revolution to replace the myths with truths and the complacency with action.