World Food Prize

Increased yields quickly translated into increased earnings. Those earnings have allowed Joane to expand her farmland to
The Food Sovereignty Prize begun in 2009 to champion social movements, activists and community-based organizations around the world working to ensure that all people have access to fresh, nutritious food produced in harmony with the planet.
On Tuesday, June 28, Drs. Maria Andrade, Robert Mwanga, Jan Low, and Howarth Bouis were crowned the 2016 World Food Prize Laureates during a ceremony at the U.S. State Department.
They won the World Food Prize for breeding critical vitamins into the vegetable.
Indeed, the combination of highly productive hard working farm families, the greatest ever assemblage of agricultural research
As U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is meeting with his Iranian counterpart in Vienna, at some point, he might want to make a reference to an event that just took place at the State Department in Washington on July 1 -- the announcement of the 2015 World Food Prize laureate.
While there are many issues that divide us, this is one area where we could find steps to take together to defeat wheat rust and at the same time honor Dr. Borlaug.
Working together with local farmers, Dr. Norman Borlaug and his contemporaries tackled problems of huge magnitude, worked tirelessly to cross-breed new types of wheat, and eventually started a revolution in food and agriculture: The Green Revolution.
On March 25 they will be together for the first time ever. A seemingly odd Alabama-Iowa couple, in some ways, they were very similar.
Dr. Borlaug was a advocate of the inextricable connection between agriculture and nutrition. His work taught us that agriculture is a long-term solution to many immediate nutrition problems.
In 1961, President John F. Kennedy gave his speech about going to the moon and less than a decade later, America had fulfilled that goal. Two years later, he gave a similar address about ending world hunger, but 50 years later our planet is still struggling with this objective.
According to Ambassador Kenneth Quinn, president of The World Food Prize Foundation, "The greatest challenge that humans
I sat in the first row steaming, aware that sitting next to me was one of the world's most esteemed scientists, Hans Herren, who is precisely the type of GMO critic that the panel seemed to imply does not exist!
The 2013 World Food Prize credits Monsanto in the fight against hunger through sustainable agriculture -- yet there is a disconnect between the spirit of the prize and the U.S. agrochemical giant's actual practices.
What do all these efforts have in common? They are grounded in sustainable, equitable and dignified livelihoods.
This award not only communicates a false connection between GMOs and solutions to hunger and agricultural degradation, but it also diverts attention from truly "nutritious and sustainable" agroecological approaches already proving effective.
If smallholder farmers, so many of them from poor rural areas, are to thrive in the face of these climatic challenges, can we afford to rule out, as critics suggest, using biotechnology and genetically modified crops to assist them?
Apparently the way to revive lackluster seed monopolies is to guarantee them a monopoly on ending hunger. But giving the World Food Prize to the monopolies profiting from hunger is like awarding the Nobel Peace prize for going to war... wait, that's already been done.
Given the decade-long relationship I had with him in building the World Food Prize, I am sometimes asked about what the late Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Dr. Norman E. Borlaug might say about a particular topic.