world hepatitis day

First, most who are infected feel perfectly healthy. As many as 75% of the Americans living with hepatitis B or C do not
A cure exists for HCV. We can't let cost barriers to accessing life-saving medication impose a death sentence. The time is now to expand access to all who need it.
The global hepatitis community is coming together for the 6th annual World Hepatitis Day on Tuesday July 28th. This year's campaign is called 4000 Voices, referring to the fact that 4000 people die every day due to hepatitis B and C.
We've come a long way in laying the foundation to address this deadly disease. As I complete my tenure as ASH, I am moved by the public health legacy around viral hepatitis that has developed during my time in office.
A landmark public-health achievement -- stopping suffering and death from end-stage liver disease and liver cancer, while reducing and even eliminating new infections -- is well within our grasp. But we must commit to this plan and work fast.
I was stunned when I learned that hepatitis kills 1.4 million people every year, making it one of the world's top-10 killers along with ischemic heart disease, HIV/AIDS and lung cancer.
We know that political commitment and community mobilization can make the difference. For those who say that treatment is too complicated or that pharmaceutical companies will always prioritize profit over people, we should say: we've been here before.
For too long, viral hepatitis, an epidemic that doesn't necessarily make headlines, has steadily and silently affected the lives of millions of Americans.