World Humanitarian Day

Stars gathered at the U.N. headquarters in honor of World Humanitarian Day.
We cannot afford to have another Omran Daqneesh or to have more aid workers held at gunpoint. Innocent civilians and the people striving to protect them deserve more.
Would you rather struggle in a refugee camp, or risk your life crossing the sea?
Three hundred and sixty five days and still counting. The war in Yemen continues. The majority of Yemenis who have no stake
Humanitarianism and Olympism share the universal ideals of respect and dignity. Their opposites, terrorism, prejudice and violence are today our main challenges.
On Humanitarian Day it is right that we mark the plight of the millions affected and displaced by humanitarian crises across the globe and the thousands of humanitarians who dedicate their lives helping them.
From the beginning, it was clear that a medical response alone was not going to stop Ebola. And while doctors were rightly lauded for their incredibly heroic work, community mobilizers like Mariam were in the background laboring in the hot zones, changing minds almost one Guinean at a time, all the while exposing themselves to potential infection and violence.
A recent "flare up" of Ebola showed the response system is better -- but not perfect. Vigilance is still needed. And in the long-term, building a resilient health system is crucial. Resilience is a word that is often used post-Ebola.
Every day we are inundated with harrowing stories of desperation from refugees around the world. We must act with solidarity to reverse this trend. All nations have a moral obligation to assist people fleeing persecution, conflict, and hardship.
Above all, we must recognize the people who took the largest risks -- those who applied medical science, demonstrated safe health practices, and engaged in community outreach all while losing close relatives and friends to the disease.
Our world is becoming a more dangerous place. Crises are intensifying. And the people who are most poor and vulnerable are always left suffering the consequences. That is what we must remember as we mark World Humanitarian Day this year.
Today, World Humanitarian Day, commemorates the twenty-two aid workers killed in a bombing at the UN headquarters in Baghdad in 2003 and is dedicated to those who risk their lives every day to provide humanitarian aid to people around the world.
Eyad, in his mid-thirties and originally from Aleppo province, used to work as a mechanical engineer at a car manufacturing plant in Damascus. He is now working for World Vision, alongside many other engineers, to provide basic water and sanitation needs for those displaced by the conflict.
Throughout July and August of 2014, Ebola tore through Lunsar. Within only a few weeks, eight members of the staff at Massebeneh died, including the hospital's chief surgeon, Dr. Manuel García Viejo. The hospital was closed on September 24. Margaret still grieves for those friends she lost, but she also speaks empathetically about the women in the community who had nowhere to go. With no medical intervention she knows hundreds must have died, not of Ebola, but of other complications common in rural village communities.
UNITED NATIONS (AP) ― Tennis star Maria Sharapova, British mogul Richard Branson and Nobel Peace laureate Malala Yousafzai