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From self-driving cars and self-service checkout machines to the rise of the shared economy, we find ourselves wondering how rapid advancements in technology will impact how we work -- and who works. There is a vast supply of data out there warning of jobs that may soon be rendered irrelevant. That data came to life when we photographed and spoke with the individuals behind the statistics.
Our world increasingly depends on elaborate networks like electric power grids and globally dispersed manufacturing. Unless these networks are highly resilient, their benefits could be outweighed by catastrophic breakdowns.
If the digital revolution makes alternative working models and employment relationships more commonplace, policymakers will need to consider designing a system of more portable benefits. Workers in many fields are becoming free agents in digital marketplaces, for better and for worse.
BRUSSELS -- We need to end once and for all the European aberration in which markets of the past are given preference over markets of the future.
We are on the cusp of a revolution in the way work and labor are done. The changes are generating chronic insecurity and worsening inequality. Put bluntly, in the past three decades, a global market system has been emerging, aided by economic liberalization policies, a technological revolution based on electronics that has facilitated changes in organizations and a dismantling of the firm and a shift of bargaining power from workers to capital.
Do you have a business-focused brain or an empathetic one? In other words, do you typically work with a task-oriented focus
Read more on Singularity University In our current system, higher unemployment rates mean an unstable economy. We are constantly
SAN FRANCISCO -- To overcome the drag on growth of an aging world, we need to be smarter and more effective in everything that we do. We don't need to reinvent the wheel -- just by adopting best practices that already exist will get us most of the way to where we need to be. Fully embracing new technologies will do the rest.
A new virtual reality project allows users to explore an expanded replica of the Bat Cave as it appeared in the early 1990s
Recently, McDonald’s launched an initiative in the U.K. aimed at developing “soft skills,” something it claims is worth about