worrying

Sometime during the Obama Administration, I stopped sleeping.
Worry is just our feeble attempt to control the future.
After spending the past two years in between the U.S. and the German-speaking world, I'm starting to think it's more than just the fear-mongering American media that gives undue coverage to toddler-snatching alligators and brain-eating amoeba infested lakes.
I am going to get a tattoo. The following sentence will be tattooed on the delicate skin of my inner left arm: You are always where you are supposed to be.
Notice your inner mind chatter. Observe it, but don't attach to it. Recognize it as fear and only fear, as the thoughts are not of your higher self, but wounded parts of yourself. Love them and let them pass.
Too much worrying can bring on an anxiety state that has real, physiological consequences, not just emotional.
It's a difficult road for mothers because children may hold back telling you when they are teased or feel left out or don't
It's not always easy to let go of our worrisome thoughts. Some are stronger and more convincing than others. But if we can stay committed to living more in the present moment instead of believing every thought that pops up in our minds, it can really make a difference.
YOLO and FOMO: our Castor and Pollux.
Worried about something for which you can't figure out solutions on your own? Ask for help. Ask as many people as you need to, then sort through their different ideas and choose the one that feels best to you.