worrying

Sometime during the Obama Administration, I stopped sleeping.
Worry is just our feeble attempt to control the future.
After spending the past two years in between the U.S. and the German-speaking world, I'm starting to think it's more than just the fear-mongering American media that gives undue coverage to toddler-snatching alligators and brain-eating amoeba infested lakes.
I am going to get a tattoo. The following sentence will be tattooed on the delicate skin of my inner left arm: You are always where you are supposed to be.
Notice your inner mind chatter. Observe it, but don't attach to it. Recognize it as fear and only fear, as the thoughts are not of your higher self, but wounded parts of yourself. Love them and let them pass.
What I've taken away from all of this is that worrying does not serve to assist anything. Taking action does.
Every headache is a potential brain tumor and each new freckle might be malignant melanoma -- this is how my brain works. I don't run to the doctor over every ache and bump but I'm quick to climb the crazy tree with my good friend 'what-if.'
Too much worrying can bring on an anxiety state that has real, physiological consequences, not just emotional.
Children beginning around third grade begin to feel competition and face grades and testing and need their mothers to remind
It's not always easy to let go of our worrisome thoughts. Some are stronger and more convincing than others. But if we can stay committed to living more in the present moment instead of believing every thought that pops up in our minds, it can really make a difference.
Worried about something for which you can't figure out solutions on your own? Ask for help. Ask as many people as you need to, then sort through their different ideas and choose the one that feels best to you.
Astonishingly, I've managed to convince every guy I've dated in the past two and a half years that I am Cool, Chill Girl. Cool, Chill Girl is a male construct happily scoffed at among female roommates over glasses of wine, but it's a coveted label nonetheless.
To have the clarity to make smarter decisions, we have to stop worrying so much about things that are outside of our locus of control and instead, only focus on the things that we can control.
It takes effort to push back against the tide of small worries, to-do lists, people to call back, emails piling up as fast as you can delete them. Trying to meditate or to take a few moments out on the porch when full of anxiety can be infuriating. The cart is placed before the horse, and you don't get anywhere at first.
Worry is wasted energy -- energy that can be spent productively living our wonderful lives, not spinning our wheels. The future can be frightening at times. However, when we let go and trust in our limitless abundance and divine path, it's much easier to keep in the sunlight.
Fear. Worry. Self-doubt. They can keep us frozen in our tracks, unable to move forward no matter how much our heart is yearning for change in our lives.
What does worrying with someone else look like in action? For instance, does this mean you simply describe the things you