wrongful convictions

Having prosecutors police themselves is like having a hungry fox guard the henhouse. In almost all of the cases of exoneration in recent years, prosecutors have fought tooth and nail to maintain these false convictions knowingly and intentionally.
In the last twenty years, capital punishment has fallen out of favor in the United States.
Innocent people shouldn't have to suffer from underfunded attorneys. These attorneys need to be fully funded to be effective for those who cannot afford counsel.
The vast majority of prosecutors are true professionals, keenly aware of their immense power and its consequent responsibility. They form accurate conclusions on guilt far more often than the converse. Still, cognitive bias and overconfidence touch us all.
The acclaimed show has brought complex criminal justice issues to the mainstream, with viewers in more than 190 countries. But one critical area that remains untouched by OITNB is how wrongful convictions affect women.
The Innocence Project at Cardozo Law School reports 337 post-conviction exonerations in the U.S. since 1989. But damage done
Innocent people are convicted of crimes that never even happened. These are worst case events that show what happens when the justice system goes completely off the rails. This is true whether a man is convicted of a low-level misdemeanor crime or a more serious felony offense.
But as a former defense attorney, Hillary knows better. She knows there's no consistent way to reserve executions for just
"Making A Murderer" isn't just a problem in Manitowoc, Wisconsin.
Prosecutors have the power to prevent almost all wrongful convictions by seeking the truth, not just a conviction. If the pursuit of justice were the only goal, innocent men and women would not find themselves collateral casualties.
The same power dynamic seen in the Holtzclaw case allows police to coerce false testimony and secure wrongful convictions. At the end of the day, there are so many victims.
State officials in New York are reforming their policy of keeping people convicted of non-violent offenses in solitary confinement. Some hail the decision; others, including corrections officers, object, saying that solitary confinement is necessary to maintain control, and they say that keeping an individual in solitary confinement is not inhumane.
There are many different ways that people fight wrongful convictions. We all know that one place to fight is in the courtroom
Many people are responsible for securing wrongful convictions. Consider last year's record-breaking number of exonerations -- 125 in all. How many prosecutors, police officers, judges, or lawyers were fired for their participation in these 125 wrongful convictions? None.
While some prosecutors do their job honestly and stand for justice, there are others who are responsible for intentionally wrongfully convicting innocent people. And as if that weren't enough, they do whatever is necessary to maintain these false convictions.
Jim McCloskey, founder and head of the crusading group Centurion Ministries, the first organization dedicated to fighting for the wrongfully convicted, is the real deal.
I went on to win in numerous fights and tournaments. A lot of my boxing teammates went on to turn professional. At the age of 22, my whole life would change for the worse when I was wrongfully charged with, and eventually convicted for a murder I had nothing to do with.
I'm one of many prisoners who are completely innocent, but continue to suffer at the hands of prosecutors who represent anything but justice. We are not guilty, so we don't want sympathy. We demand justice from the legal system that has failed us.
I had to make the hardest decision of my life. After meetings with my family, legal team and supporters, I chose to turn myself in and fight to prove my innocence once and for all.