Yasser Arafat

Some of the plots to kill the Palestinian Liberation Organization leader sound like action-movie scenes.
Whereas Israel enjoys a preponderance of military and economic power and negotiates from a position of strength, the Palestinians are living under occupation with a limited ability to challenge Israel.
On the 20th anniversary of Rabin's assassination, Israelis and Palestinians debate what might have been if he had survived.
I love movies because they seem to simplify life. Nowhere is it more clear than on the big screen when a character's predicament begins to shift.
The Oslo Accords and its attendant peace process came into the world with a bang 22 years ago. This past week they exited with a sad whimper.
At this time of year exactly thirty years ago, a Palestinian militant named Abu al-Abbas sat behind his office desk in Tunis, laying the final touches on an operation scheduled for October 1985.
The enduring impasse between Israel and the Palestinians in the peace negotiations and their changing internal political dynamics has made it impossible for them to resolve the conflict on their own.
When two sides take political risks and strain to reach agreement, only to see negotiations fall apart, they don't go back to where they were before - they go back to a much angrier version of where they were before. It is a vital lesson to keep in mind this week as representatives from Iran and America meet.
There are so many stakeholders, not only in the Middle East but also in Europe and beyond, that would like to see an end to this madness in Gaza. The vital thing confronting us today is for the U.S. to put pressure on Israel to lift the siege of Gaza and seek a viable and realistic political solution.
Once this procedure has been performed - and, yes, it hurts the doctor as much as the patient - the poor, but grateful, people
Reactions to the horrific back-to-back kidnappings and murders of three young Israelis and a Palestinian teen have made clear several disturbing realities that must not be ignored.
In a meeting I had this week with a congressional candidate, I was reminded of the power of the myths that define conventional wisdom about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the challenge they pose for rational discourse.
Some readers made disparaging remarks about the Palestinian leader -- the kindest of which was to point out the obvious fact that "Arafat was no Mandela." While that statement was, of course, true, it missed the point.
In late February of 1990, just two weeks after being released from prison, Nelson Mandela met with Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasir Arafat. Afterwards Mandela spoke publicly of his affinity with the Palestinian people and his support for their struggle.
A lawyer for Suha Arafat said her legal team would do a counter-expertise and was confident it would show that the French
"In my opinion, this is a tempest in a tea cup. But even if it was (poisoning), it certainly was not Israel. Maybe someone
Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat was poisoned to death in 2004 with radioactive polonium, his widow Suha said on Wednesday after receiving the results of Swiss forensic tests on her husband's corpse.
El líder palestino Yasser Arafat aparentemente fue envenenado en el 2004, según la agencia Reuters después de entrevistar
She did not accuse any country or person, and acknowledged that the historic leader of the Palestine Liberation Organization