year-of-the-boomer

Most boomers at the upper end of the demographic know healthy diet and regular exercise help maintain a youthful body. And while physical exercise doesn't do much to prevent a boomer's spirit from aging, a new adventure can.
I have come to notice over the past few years that my "little dancing friend" doesn't show up as often in the mornings.
Now that summer is quickly approaching, I am reminded of one more thing that I really miss from my youth. The warmer weather brings with it bar-b-cues, picnics, baseball games and family get-togethers. These bring out the foods I can no longer eat that I loved when I was younger.
The third "thing" that I want to talk to you about that I miss from my youth is the "ability to drink."
Today, I proudly watch sports. I am an armchair quarterback. I am the king of fantasy football. Now, instead of dreaming about playing in the World Series or the Superbowl, I travel the world to watch these great sporting events live.
Anyway, I bet those of us (men and women) who miss playing competitive sports wish we could go back and have it all over again.
Shifra Raz and Benny Rubinstein seem like just another happily retired couple living in Santa Monica, CA. Shifra was a teacher for much of her career, while Benny was trained as an engineer and worked as a project manager in the Southern California aerospace industry. Both Israeli immigrants to the U.S., they met and fell in love 17 years ago, on the heels of Shifra's divorce from her 31-year marriage.
I am a proud Baby Boomer, and believe our moniker is right on target. Our arrival caused a sonic boom in the population, our work ethic is both unsurpassed and bordering on maniacal, and we are hanging onto relevancy like a cat being pulled from a scratching post filled with catnip. We survive even when the Millennials wish we would die already so they could find a job.
For Boomers who have spent their career mostly in one or two jobs within the same industry, the prospect of flipping to a new career after so many years can be beyond daunting. It is inspiring when we discover Boomer compatriots who demonstrate that setting an intention, coupled with a sense of purpose, can make career reinvention a relatively smooth process.
Career reinvention is a messy business. It is usually not a one-step transition. Sometimes, it can take a few pivots to work out the kinks and make the necessary mistakes to find one's true calling. What we think we want to do, or should do, may not necessarily be the best thing for us to do, or the right thing for us to do.